DREAMS AND THEIR MEANINGS

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DREAMS AND THEIR MEANINGS. By Dr. J. A. Hadfield Presentation: Jason M. Ward ACWR101. 1/19. Skim Excerpts From. First paragraph The first sentence from Physiological Theory Personal Reminiscence Theory Racial Reminiscence Premonitory. 2/19. A 190-word Summary 1/3. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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<ul><li><p>DREAMS AND THEIR MEANINGS</p><p>By Dr. J. A. Hadfield</p><p>Presentation:Jason M. WardACWR1011/19</p></li><li><p>Skim Excerpts From...First paragraphThe first sentence fromPhysiological TheoryPersonal Reminiscence Theory Racial Reminiscence Premonitory </p><p>2/19</p></li><li><p>A 190-word Summary 1/3 Dr. Hadfield starts with an anecdote to illustrate the diversity of dreams. He provides a historical overview explaining how some primitive cultures believed dreams more than waking life. He also briefly mentions the role of dreams in religion and the Classical period citing Joseph and Homer. 3/19</p></li><li><p>A 190-word Summary 2/34/19Within Modern Popular Theories, he discusses the physiological theory, which is concerned with how the condition of the body might affect a dreams content whether the dreamer is hot, disturbed by sounds, smells or illness. Hadfield discusses The Personal Reminiscence Theory, the notion that dreams are based on memories modified in ways that reflect our emotional response to them. </p></li><li><p>A 190-word Summary 3/35/19The Theory of Racial Reminiscence is the idea that dreams are from our distant ancestry and might explain phobias. Here, Hadfield cites Jungs claim that we dream things we have never experienced because dreams are more than memories. In the Premonitory Theory, Hadfield asserts that it has always been widely accepted (p. 11) that dreams can predict the future and claims that there is definite a psychological truth to this theory because our subconscious can see events coming that the conscious mind cannot accept. Hadfield also looks at Freuds predecessors and their discussions on the consistency and form of dreams. He concludes by discussing when dreams take place or what might trigger them.</p></li><li><p>1. Do you agree with Hadfields assertion that dreams can predict the future?</p><p>I disagree that dreams can predict the future because this then assumes that the future is already set has effectively already happened. However, I think that there is some truth in the claim that dreams can psychologically predict the future because we live much of our life in denial and dreams can show us the truth of our emotions, relationships and their possible outcomes.6/19</p></li><li><p>2. Do you think that dreams are meaningful? </p><p>I dont think that all dreams mean something but all readings do. When you analyse a dream you are looking into your mind and your initial process of analysis can reveal as much about you as the dream. However, I do think that certain dreams are important because they are insights into things you know but dont know you know.7/19</p></li><li><p>3. Have you ever had a dream including something that was really happening outside (in the real world) and what do you think this says about dreams?I frequently have these kinds of dreams with noises and when this happens I think, How did the dream know that noise was about to happen? The whole story of the dream seems to have been moving to that point. This makes me think that the time of dreams is different not only in terms of duration but also causality. We always think that A causes B but perhaps when B happens outside, the dream swiftly goes back to write or re-write A to fit. 8/19</p></li><li><p>MCQ 1According to Hadfield, who said, "we dream of many things, which we have never personally experienced"? A. Jung B. Freud C. Adler 9/19</p></li><li><p>MCQ 1According to Hadfield, who said, "we dream of many things, which we have never personally experienced"? A. Jung B. Freud C. Adler 9/19</p></li><li><p>MCQ 2What is the psychological truth of premonitory theory? A. Our subconscious can see how events might progress better than the conscious mind B. Psychologists usually have psychic powers C. Those who understand the psychology of their dreams are more likely to have psychic powers10/19</p></li><li><p>MCQ 2What is the psychological truth of premonitory theory? A. Our subconscious can see how events might progress better than the conscious mind B. Psychologists usually have psychic powers C. Those who understand the psychology of their dreams are more likely to have psychic powers10/19</p></li><li><p>MCQ 3What is the chapter title of the Hadfield reading?</p><p>A.Dreaming your life away: An introduction to dreamingB.Introduction: Sleep, dreams and REMC. Historical Survey: Introduction: Popular and historical theories11/19</p></li><li><p>MCQ 3What is the chapter title of the Hadfield reading?</p><p>A.Dreaming your life away: An introduction to dreamingB.Introduction: Sleep, dreams and REMC. Historical Survey: Introduction: Popular and historical theories11/19</p></li><li><p>GlossaryInclude THREE NEW VOCABULARY WORDS. You must include:THE SENTENCE AND PAGE NUMBER WHERE YOU FOUND THE WORD A SENTENCE OF YOUR OWN, which must not be plagiarized A DICTIONARY DEFINITION of the above use of the word 12/19</p></li><li><p>Apprehension13/19</p></li><li>Apprehension going through tunnels with terrific apprehension (p. 1)I was apprehensive about the first day of class. DEFINITION: suspicion or fear especially of future evil : foreboding </li><li><p>Kaleidoscopic15/19</p></li><li><p>Kaleidoscopic</p><p>Such a theory would explain also the bizarre and kaleidoscopic nature of our dreams (p. 6).Looking through the bottom of the thick glass provided a strange view of the room the people and objects around me looked chopped up and distorted as though I was looking through a kaleidoscopeDEFINITION: something resembling a kaleidoscope: as a : a variegated changing pattern or scene </p></li><li><p>Hallucination17/19</p></li><li><p>Hallucinationthe toxic process [can] give rise to the dream or hallucination (p. 98).After the accident, the drugs the hospital gave Mert were so strong that he had hallucinations and thought the doctors and nurses were angels.DEFINITION: perception of objects with no reality usually arising from disorder of the nervous system or in response to drugs 18/19</p></li><li><p>Thank you!Any Questions?19/19</p></li></ul>