downtown london brt routing options 2014-03-13آ  5. transit service routing options many of the...

Download DOWNTOWN LONDON BRT ROUTING OPTIONS 2014-03-13آ  5. Transit Service Routing Options Many of the options

Post on 22-May-2020

1 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • 2030 London Transportation Master Plan

    DOWNTOWN LONDON BRT ROUTING OPTIONS June 1, 2011

    60114661-6945_App C_2012-02-06_Londondowntownroutes_V7.Docx

    Table of Contents

    1. Introduction ................................................................................................................... 1

    2. Background ................................................................................................................... 2

    3. Assumptions .................................................................................................................. 2

    4. Principles of Routing / Criteria ..................................................................................... 3

    5. Transit Service Routing Options .................................................................................. 4

    5.1 Base Case ........................................................................................................................... 4 5.2 Option 1 ............................................................................................................................... 5 5.3 Option 2 ............................................................................................................................... 6 5.4 Option 3 ............................................................................................................................... 7 5.5 Option 4 ............................................................................................................................... 8 5.6 Option 5 ............................................................................................................................... 9

    6. Option Comparison ..................................................................................................... 10

    6.1 Benefits ............................................................................................................................. 10 6.2 Costs ................................................................................................................................. 11

    7. Conclusion ................................................................................................................... 11

  • 2030 London Transportation Master Plan

    DOWNTOWN LONDON BRT ROUTING OPTIONS June 1, 2011

    60114661-6945_App C_2012-02-06_Londondowntownroutes_V7.Docx 1

    1. Introduction

    As part of the 2030 Transportation Master Plan for the City of London, two BRT routes are proposed in

    the near term to help the City achieve a transit mode share of 15% to 20%. Based on an analysis of the

    various corridors of the City, a north-south route using Wellington Street to the south of Downtown and

    Richmond Street to the north of Downtown was identified for the first BRT route, and an east-west route

    using Dundas Street to the east of Downtown and Oxford Street to the west of Downtown was identified

    as a second BRT route (see map below). Both routes would support City objectives for revitalization and

    continued growth in the Downtown.

    Stop/Station Locations in Preferred Transit Corridors

    Source: Interim Report #2 : Towards a More Sustainable Transportation System

    in London, 2030 Transportation Master Plan

    March 2011

    The Downtown routing of the BRT routes is important because it will have an impact on the perceived

    quality and convenience of the new BRT routes and overall transit network. The Downtown is one of the

    largest transit trip generators (the University of Western Ontario being the other), and so extensive BRT

    coverage will be important for making these services convenient and useful to passengers, and for

    achieving transit modal splits considerably higher than the current 11% . The Downtown will be the

    meeting point of the proposed first two BRT routes. With investment in the supporting infrastructure for

    BRT in terms of transit priority measures, enhanced shelters, sidewalks, etc., BRT may also have an

    impact on urban development and, thus, attention to design will also be important.

  • 2030 London Transportation Master Plan

    DOWNTOWN LONDON BRT ROUTING OPTIONS June 1, 2011

    60114661-6945_App C_2012-02-06_Londondowntownroutes_V7.Docx 2

    2. Background

    This memo addresses the question of what the best routings for the future BRT routes will be downtown.

    Background information for this analysis came from:

     Second interim report for the TMP update: Towards a More Sustainable Transportation

    System in London;

     Draft Downtown Plan documents;

     Existing bus maps and schedules from London Transit Commission website;

     Bicycle Master Plan: A Guideline Document for Bicycle Infrastructure In the City of London

    March 2005;

     Downtown Terminal report by Dillon Consulting; and

     City of London staff review of the Dillon report.

    3. Assumptions

    The following assumptions were made in the development of the options and in comparing them:

     Pedestrian-focus corridors are most likely to be located on Carling and Clarence, as these

    streets have relatively little automobile traffic now and so the impacts on the overall

    Downtown traffic network would be minimal.

     Bicycle lanes are reserved on York, Colburne, Ridout, and Dufferin around Downtown.

     Richmond Street will have full-time exclusive bus lanes in the curb lanes along its entire

    length in the Downtown due to the number of buses projected to use it.

     A new traffic signal phase for bus-only left turns from the curb lane will be needed. This will

    impact any routings in which buses traveling southbound on Richmond Street and turning

    left onto King, York, or Dundas; any buses traveling north on Wellington and turning left

    onto York, Dundas, or Queens; or any buses traveling east on York or King and turning left

    on Wellington, Waterloo or Colborne.

     Routes 6, 13, and 2 are the routes most likely to be replaced by the first two new BRT

    routes. The north-south route would likely replace much of routes 6 and 13 while the east-

    west route would replace much of route 2.

     Total transit fleet needs are the same in all options.

     Operating costs of all options will be the same. While some route options may have shorter

    travel times within the downtown, there would be longer travel times outside of the

    downtown.

     There is less congestion within the downtown core itself than on the primary arteries

    leading into and out of the Downtown.

     An off-street exchange is not assumed, but is evaluated for comparison purposes.

  • 2030 London Transportation Master Plan

    DOWNTOWN LONDON BRT ROUTING OPTIONS June 1, 2011

    60114661-6945_App C_2012-02-06_Londondowntownroutes_V7.Docx 3

    4. Principles of Routing / Criteria

    The routing should create at transit presence in the Downtown, meaning that the streets designated for

    transit should appear well used, and the services should be visible to as many people as possible. The

    rationale behind this principle is that the more people who see the BRT services in their day-to-day

    activities downtown, the more people who will use them. A related principle is that the stations should be

    placed close to the trip generators and inter-city bus and rail services, the overall objective being to

    maximize transit ridership and modal split for Downtown travel.

    To that end, the following criteria are considered to be the most important for evaluating the

    attractiveness of a routing option. Convenience, attractiveness, and safety for transit passengers is

    considered the most important area, and adaptability to near- and long-term transportation plans are also

    considered to be important. Traffic and parking operations, and operators’ amenities are considered to be

    less important. Elements of the routing options that would have an impact on cost will also be noted. The

    ability to convert the BRT routes to LRT routes in the future was not listed as a criterion because it is

    believed that this option lies too far into the future to have an impact on a choice that must be made in the

    near term.

     Convenient, attractive, accessible and safe for transit passengers:

     Proximity of stops to trip generators

     Ease of transfers between BRT routes

     Proximity of stops to inter-city bus and rail stations

     No “splits” in route; stations serving same route in opposite directions are across the

    street

     Adaptable to long-term transportation needs:

     Permanent pedestrian-only zones: assume that sections of Carling and/or Clarence

    will become closed to motorized traffic in the long-term

     Supportive of Downtown Plan and Transportation Goals:

     Wider sidewalks

     Temporary pedestrian-only zones; assume that Dundas will be closed to motorized

    traffic several times per year for special events

     BRT routes compatible with bicycle lanes

     Traffic/Parking Operations

     Driveway access to businesses, residences and parking

     Roadway capacity for automobiles

     On-street parking

     Operator Amenities

     Rest faci