MRS. SAMANTHA L. HUNTLEY

Download MRS. SAMANTHA L. HUNTLEY

Post on 10-Jan-2017

218 views

Category:

Documents

4 download

TRANSCRIPT

  • MRS. SAMANTHA L. HUNTLEYBulletin of the Detroit Museum of Art, Vol. 6, No. 1 (JANUARY, 1912), pp. 11-12Published by: Detroit Institute of ArtsStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41934870 .Accessed: 14/05/2014 14:36

    Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

    .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.

    .

    Detroit Institute of Arts is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Bulletin of theDetroit Museum of Art.

    http://www.jstor.org

    This content downloaded from 193.104.110.108 on Wed, 14 May 2014 14:36:53 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

    http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=diahttp://www.jstor.org/stable/41934870?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

  • BULLETN OF THE DETROIT MUSEUM OF ART 11

    two Lisbon subjects unusual in style, but very select in arrangement and har- monious color.

    Edward J. Packbauer was represented oy a group of landscapes which call attention to the subjects about our own doors. His things are broad in treat- ment and show a good striving for com- position, light effects and atmosphere, and his values are well maintained.

    A group of color sketches by Roy C. Gamble were very pleasing. Though he has not passed his quarter of a century in years, he has a fine technical training, unusual in so young a student. Many of his studies are foreign impressions of light and color.

    A. B. Wenzell, of New York, made a charter member of the Club because of this city being his former home and because of his close association with Robert Hopkin, so far showed an in- terest in the exhibition as to send one of his typical canvasses which added much interest to the exhibition.

    George S. Hodges of Pine Lake, who has lived in retirement since his return from Paris, trying to assimilate the ideas there inculcated, exhibited a group of landscapes and other subjects, which show that he is working out his salva- tion as a painter very well. His winter scenes were particularly good. His technique appears simple, getting much out of little without apparent effort. His color harmonies are quiet but com- pelling.

    Charles B. King was represented by three paintings done, during days off from business, which were fine in ar- rangement and color.

    PAUL HONORE. An exhibition which attracted con-

    siderable attention was that of the Stu- dies and Sketches for Mural Decora- tions by Mr. Paul Honor of this city, lield in the East Gallery in November, and much interest was shown in his initial exhibition.

    Mr. Honor, while having a wide circle of friends and acquaintances in Detroit has never exhibited before, and no one save tnose most intimate with him, and those who have employed his talent, were aware of his rare quali- fications to boldly enter the arena of his chosen field. Many of the studies by the artist were done while he was abroad under the eye of that master of composition, irrank Brangwyn, and though they are mere impressions taken from nature here and there, they in- variably show fine arrangement of spaces and masses, and breadth of treat- ment. The years of training which he has had have been well spent, and he finds himself well equipped to share in the production and promotion of the beautiful.

    Mr. Honor studied in the Pennsyl- vania Academy of Fine Arts, and in the Detroit Art Academy, now the De- troit School of Fine Arts, and with Frank Brangwyn, of London, England, where he went to acquire the principles of composition, so necessary in the suc- cessful mural decoration.

    MRS. SAMANTHA L. HUNTLEY. During the month of December an

    exhibition of portraits in oil by Mrs. Samantha L. Huntley hung in one of the East Galleries. There were only a dozen portraits in the group, but they were of unusual interest from the fact that three of the group were subjects well known in Detroit.

    Director A. H. Griffith of the Mu- seum was one of the strongest and most satisfactory portraits, and this has been presented to the Museum by a friend of the Director who felt that it should form a part of the collection with which the subject has had so much to do during twenty-one years of service.

    Portraits of Mrs. Charles L. Palms and Miss Isabel Palms are also in the group, the pictorial quality of the latter

    This content downloaded from 193.104.110.108 on Wed, 14 May 2014 14:36:53 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

    http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

  • 12 BULLETIN OF THE DETROIT MUSEUM OF ART

    splendidly acquired with a masterly technical ski.l, now gentle, now force- ful, but always with an absence of tim- idity.

    Of her other subjects of prominent people in many states, her portrait of Rt. Rev. John J. Glennon, Archbishop

    of St. Louis gave the artist an oppor- tunity to show her color sense.

    In fact the entire group was well chosen to show the masterly training of this artist, who is rapidly making a name for herself throughout the country.

    Un lHemoram At a meeting of the Trustees of the Detroit Museum of Art held

    Jan. 15th, the following resolutions were passed and spread upon the records :

    In the death of Elisha H. Flinn the Detroit Museum of Art lost a warm friend who was always interested in its work and progress. Partic- ularly was this so in anything of an educational nature, or that seemed to be for the general good of the people.

    Resolved , that the Officers and Trustees of the Detroit Museum of Art fully realize that they and the citizens of Detroit, in the death of Mr. Flinn, have sustained a loss which they deeply feel, and that they desire to express to the family their sincere sympathy in their bereavement, and be it further

    Resolved , that the above be spread upon the records and a copy sent to the family.

    By order of the Trustees, A. H. Griffith,

    Secretary.

    In flDemodam The Trustees of the Detroit Museum of Art learn with deep regret

    of the passing from this life of Mrs. William H. Stevens, who for sev- eral years had taken a deep interest in the work undertaken by the Museum, and in many ways had encouraged it in its efforts for a greater and more useful future. Be it

    Resolved , that the Officers and Trustees of the Detroit Museum of Art deplore the death of Mrs. Stevens, and sin- cerely sympathize with her family and friends, and be it further

    Resolved, that the above be spread upon the records and a copy sent to the family.

    By order of .the Trustees, A. H. Griffith,

    Secretary.

    This content downloaded from 193.104.110.108 on Wed, 14 May 2014 14:36:53 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

    http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

    Article Contentsp. 11p. 12

    Issue Table of ContentsBulletin of the Detroit Museum of Art, Vol. 6, No. 1 (JANUARY, 1912), pp. 1-12JULIUS ROLSHOVEN [pp. 1-1]SOCIETY OF WESTERN ARTISTS [pp. 2-2]IMPORTANT ADDITIONS [pp. 2-3]ADDITIONS TO THE WARD COLLECTION [pp. 3-3]COMING EXHIBITIONS [pp. 3-3]EDITORIALLY [pp. 4-5]LECTURES [pp. 5-6]ARTS AND CRAFTS LECTURES [pp. 6-6]FELICITATIONS [pp. 6-6]ACQUISITIONS [pp. 6-7]NEIGHBORS [pp. 7-7]RECENT EXHIBITIONS REVIEWEDMRS. MARIE PERRAULT [pp. 8-8]C. HARRY ALLIS [pp. 8-8]THE HOPKIN CLUB PAINTERS [pp. 8-11]PAUL HONORE [pp. 11-11]MRS. SAMANTHA L. HUNTLEY [pp. 11-12]

    In Memoram [pp. 12-12]In Memoram [pp. 12-12]