dining with mother nature

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  • Dining withMother Nature

  • Table of Contents

    1. Tools & Equipment2. Building a cooking campfire3. Preparing a proper Dutch Oven

    Plants & Berries4. Blackberry 5. Huckleberry 6. Clover 7. Dandelion 8. Salal 9. Thimbleberry

    Sea Plants & Sea Weeds10. Sea Asparagus 11. Sea Lettuce & Dark Sea Lettuce 12. Purple Laver

    Campfire Treats13. Bannock14. Banana Boats15. Baked Caramelized Apples 16. Orange Brownies17. Campfire Cinnamon Rolls18. Dutch Oven cheese pulls 19. Grilled cheese20. Peach Cobbler

  • From the Kitchen of Mother Nature

    To Start a Cooking Fire- Charcoal briquettes- Hatchet- Kindling- Green sticks or a grate

    For Cooking- Large pot with a lid or Dutch Oven- Tin foil- Tongs

    For clean up and safety- Small straw broom- Heat resistant gloves- Bucket for water & collecting berries

    What you will need

  • From the Kitchen of Mother Nature

    Step 1: Select a re site at well away from bushes or any combustibles.- Make a U-shaped perimeter using large rocks or green logs (if using logs, wet down from time to time)- Put a large at rock at the rear of the re pit to act as a chimney.

    The "chimney rock" will help direct the smoke up and away.

    - If re pit is already a circular shape that is ne as well

    Step 2: Fill the re area with crumpled paper or dried leaves.- Lay kindling over paper/leaves in layers, alternating direction

    with each layer.

    - Gather thin splits of wood or small dead branches Do not put kindling down "teepee style".

    The whole re area should be covered with the kindling

    stack.

    - Set a bucket of water near the re area. Light the paper to

    start your re.

    Step 3: When kindling is ablaze, add rewood. - As soon as the last ames die down leaving mostly white coals,

    use stick to push the coals into a higher level at the back end & lower level at the front.

    This will give you the equivalent of 'Hi', 'Med' and 'Lo'

    cook settings. Or, keep coals level.

    Tip: Keep wood roughly the same size.- Use hardwood or hardwood branches if available.

    - Distribute wood evenly over re bed.

    To cook: set grill on rocks or wetted green logs. - Put food directly on grill or in cookware and prepare your meal.

    If cooking directly on the grill, a small spray bottle or squirt gun

    is handy for shooting down any rogue ames.

    - As the re diminishes, gather coals to one area get the most

    heat from them.

    Building a Cooking fire

  • From the Kitchen of Mother Nature

    Dutch Oven Temperature Gauge

    300 14 8325 15 9350 16 10375 17 11400 18 12425 19 13450 20 14500 21 15

    Temp. F Top Bottom

    Dutch ovens are made of cast iron and retain heat extremely well. They stay warm for hours and hours after cooking.Great for slow cooking such as stews, chili & roastsAlso used for breads, rolls, cakes & cobblers

    Secret #1: Start charcoal as soon as you can, it needs time to warm up (20-30 min)*By the time everything is mixed the coals will be ready!

    Secret #2: Coals must be arranged evenly on top and bottom

    Secret #3: Line the inside with foil. This will prevent any sticking and generally less clean up.

    Cooking with a Dutch Oven

  • HOW TO EAT:- Edible raw- Berries can be used for jam, jelly- pick for cereal, yogurt- mash into a spread for toast or crackers- Dry berries for storage

    From the Kitchen of Mother Nature

    INFORMATIONSeason: August - mid-October- mature berry is very sweet.- bush has formidable thorns.- varieties in British Columbia are: Himalayan blackberry, Trailing blackberry, & Highbush blackberry

    Fact: the blackberry is an example of a compound berry, since it consists of a tight cluster of smaller parts, resembling a raspberry.

    BLACKBERRY

  • From the Kitchen of Mother Nature HUCKLEBERRY

    INFORMATION- plant is a deciduous or evergreen shrub.- varieties in British Columbia are: Thinleaf huckleberry & Evergreen huckleberry

    Where they grow:- Grows in forests in montane and sub-alpine areas.

    HOW TO EAT:- berry is sweeter than the Red huckleberry.- berry is picked and enjoyed as jams, jelly, and pie

    Nutrients:- berry is high in vitamin C.

    Season: Mid-late August

  • From the Kitchen of Mother Nature

    CLOVER

    INFORMATION- varieties in British Columbia are: Red clover, Alsike clover, White clover & Springbank clover.

    Where they grow:- grows in a wide range of terrain, look in disturbed soil areas

    WARNINGS:- difficult to digest, can cause bloating.- red clover in autumn should be avoided or not be eaten in large quantities due to alkaloids.

    HOW TO EAT:Delicious is salads, sandwiches, & wrapsYou want the clover to be young and fresh, whether white or pink or red. - white clover is the better tasting of them all.- above-ground parts can be eaten raw- best when cooked or dipped in saltwater (counteracts bloating)- flowerheads can be eaten raw, dried or cooked- flowerheads and seedheads can be ground into flour- sprouts have the best taste

    Season: year round when grasses grow - evergreen perennial

  • From the Kitchen of Mother Nature DANDELION

    INFORMATIONWhere they grow:- plants that grow in shade where there is less or no sunlight are least bitter- grows in a wide range of terrain, look for dandelion in disturb/cultivated soil areas.

    WARNING: Avoid using dandelion if you are pregnant or breast-feeding.

    HOT TO EAT: - all parts of plant are edible- Eat in salads, root is used as a coffee substitute, flower is used in salads

    NUTRIENTS: leaves of dandelion con-tain same amount of calcium as cup of milk- Contains vitamin: A, B1, B2, B3, C, E- Minerals: chromium, iron, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, potassium, sodium, selenium, silicon, zinc- Is known to be one of the safest and best diuretics because of its high potassium content

    Season: Perennial meaning it reproduces for 2 or more years without re-planting

  • From the Kitchen of Mother Nature

    SALAL

    INFORMATIONWhere they grow:- plant grows in coastal areas and forms deep thickets- under evergreens & deciduous trees where most shrubs will not survive

    Here's a fun thing to do with Salal leaves: - pick a nice healthy leaf & roll it into a cone. It makes a tiny natural drinking cup!

    HOW TO EAT:- berries are mildly sweet with good flavour.- berries can be dried into cakes.- It is a power preservative which is excellent to use as a base to fruit leather

    NUTRIENTS: loaded with vitamins and antioxidants that prevent degeneration and help us to live a long and sustaining life.

    Season: flowers early spring / berries ripe to pick late summer August - Sept

  • From the Kitchen of Mother Nature THIMBLEBERRY

    INFORMATION- mature berry is thin, coarse, seedy and has neutral taste.- plant has no thorns.- plant has large, maple-like leaves.

    Where they grow:- grows in foothill and montane regions.

    FUN FACT:- the thimbleberry is an example of a compound berry, since it consists of a tight cluster of smaller parts, resembling a raspberry. *Compound berries are generally edible.- Native Americans dried and stored these fruits for winter use.- People also used these plants to alleviate toothaches and applied Thimbleberry leaf powder on cuts & wounds to minimize scars.

    HOW TO EAT:- young shoots can be peeled and eaten raw- make into jam by adding a bit of sugar or honey

    Nutrients:- contain moderate amounts of vitamins and minerals that help in the growth and immunity of human bodyPer 100g Carbohydrates: 10 gm Fat: 0.33 gm Protein: 1 gm Calories: 47

    WARNING: avoid eating wilted leaves, which can contain toxins.

    Season: August - September

  • SEA ASPARAGUSFrom the Kitchen of Mother Nature

    INFORMATION- plant is best when gathered before flowering.- varieties in British Columbia are Red glasswort & American glasswort

    Where they grow:- grows in saltwater marshes & in the salty soil near high-tide areas

    *Cut 6 lengths from the tips of the plants, leaving the shallow root system behind to bear more veg again next year.

    HOW TO EAT:- plant is edible raw but better when cooked/boiled- top-half of stems can be harvested, allowing the bottom to grow a new shoot- plant has a salty taste

    Season: best picked from mid-June through late-July

  • From the Kitchen of Mother Nature SEA LETTUCE

    INFORMATION

    HOW TO EAT Sea Lettuce:- edible raw.- should be washed well or soaked in water for two hours before using to moderate the flavor. - Use in soups and salads it can even be toasted over charcoal.

    HOW TO EAT Dark Sea Lettuce:- looks very similar, and is also edible. - Unlike Sea lettuce, it turns a dark colour when dried

    WARNING: blue-green algae found in freshwater lakes and streams is poisonous.

    HOW TO EAT:Delicious is salads, sandwiches, & wrapsYou want the clover to be young and fresh, whether white or pink or red. - white clover is the better tasting of them all.- above-ground parts can be eaten raw- best when cooked or dipped in saltwater (counteracts bloating)- flowerheads can be eaten raw, dried or cooked- flowerheads and seedheads can be ground into flour- sprouts have the best taste

    Season: all year, with large blooms in the summer.

    Sea Lettuce:- consists of single, flat, tissue-thin sheet which is long and narrow or fan shaped.- u