Dictionnaire des editeurs de musique francais. Tome I: Des origines a environ 1820

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  • Dictionnaire des diteurs de musique franais. Tome I: Des origines environ 1820 by AnikDevris; Franois LesureReview by: Lenore CoralNotes, Second Series, Vol. 37, No. 1 (Sep., 1980), pp. 61-62Published by: Music Library AssociationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/940267 .Accessed: 14/06/2014 10:39

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  • Book Reviews Book Reviews Book Reviews

    specialized a volume, if only because the reading population of bagpipe players and music historians interested in the instru- ment is relatively small, and because the heart of the book seems really to be over- seas. Nonetheless, Cannon has put together a valuable account of British pipes and their music, while at the same time unearthing a rather obscure segment in the history of music publishing.

    AMY AARON

    The Juilliard School

    Orchestral Music in Print. Edited by Margaret K. Farish. Philadelphia: Mu- sicdata Inc., 1980. [1029 p.; $60.00]

    The fifth issue in Musicdata's ongoing Music-in-Print series pursues the format and organizational procedures of previous volumes. The publisher claims to include "more than 44,000 entries of orchestral works currently available for sale or rent from music publishers .. ." Composers and cross-referenced titles are interfiled. Intelligent editorial intervention weeds out those trivialities of ordering to which computer-data-based lists are prone. Among the information given is instru- mentation, timing, publisher, and publish- er's catalogue number. The page format is tricolumnar, with an eye-destroying 6 or 7 point lightweight sans-serif typeface. Running heads, which would be exception- ally useful at this low level of decipherabil- ity, are absent.

    Orchestral Music in Print is a major ad- vance in bringing the bulk of orchestral music performance materials currently available in commerce under informal bib- liographic control, but it should not be taken as the complete and final authority on what happened to be available at the time the book went to press. The editor/compiler's total reliance upon secondary sources of information has resulted in pervasive small ambiguities, and some sizeable lacunae. It leaps to the eye, for example, that most (if not all) of Universal Edition's for-sale orchestra music is not listed. A major gap is in the production of Haydn-Mozart Presse, Salzburg, whose performance ma- terials are in many cases the only modern edition of a Haydn symphony available in parts. That's a block of more than fifty symphonic works of major importance left

    specialized a volume, if only because the reading population of bagpipe players and music historians interested in the instru- ment is relatively small, and because the heart of the book seems really to be over- seas. Nonetheless, Cannon has put together a valuable account of British pipes and their music, while at the same time unearthing a rather obscure segment in the history of music publishing.

    AMY AARON

    The Juilliard School

    Orchestral Music in Print. Edited by Margaret K. Farish. Philadelphia: Mu- sicdata Inc., 1980. [1029 p.; $60.00]

    The fifth issue in Musicdata's ongoing Music-in-Print series pursues the format and organizational procedures of previous volumes. The publisher claims to include "more than 44,000 entries of orchestral works currently available for sale or rent from music publishers .. ." Composers and cross-referenced titles are interfiled. Intelligent editorial intervention weeds out those trivialities of ordering to which computer-data-based lists are prone. Among the information given is instru- mentation, timing, publisher, and publish- er's catalogue number. The page format is tricolumnar, with an eye-destroying 6 or 7 point lightweight sans-serif typeface. Running heads, which would be exception- ally useful at this low level of decipherabil- ity, are absent.

    Orchestral Music in Print is a major ad- vance in bringing the bulk of orchestral music performance materials currently available in commerce under informal bib- liographic control, but it should not be taken as the complete and final authority on what happened to be available at the time the book went to press. The editor/compiler's total reliance upon secondary sources of information has resulted in pervasive small ambiguities, and some sizeable lacunae. It leaps to the eye, for example, that most (if not all) of Universal Edition's for-sale orchestra music is not listed. A major gap is in the production of Haydn-Mozart Presse, Salzburg, whose performance ma- terials are in many cases the only modern edition of a Haydn symphony available in parts. That's a block of more than fifty symphonic works of major importance left

    specialized a volume, if only because the reading population of bagpipe players and music historians interested in the instru- ment is relatively small, and because the heart of the book seems really to be over- seas. Nonetheless, Cannon has put together a valuable account of British pipes and their music, while at the same time unearthing a rather obscure segment in the history of music publishing.

    AMY AARON

    The Juilliard School

    Orchestral Music in Print. Edited by Margaret K. Farish. Philadelphia: Mu- sicdata Inc., 1980. [1029 p.; $60.00]

    The fifth issue in Musicdata's ongoing Music-in-Print series pursues the format and organizational procedures of previous volumes. The publisher claims to include "more than 44,000 entries of orchestral works currently available for sale or rent from music publishers .. ." Composers and cross-referenced titles are interfiled. Intelligent editorial intervention weeds out those trivialities of ordering to which computer-data-based lists are prone. Among the information given is instru- mentation, timing, publisher, and publish- er's catalogue number. The page format is tricolumnar, with an eye-destroying 6 or 7 point lightweight sans-serif typeface. Running heads, which would be exception- ally useful at this low level of decipherabil- ity, are absent.

    Orchestral Music in Print is a major ad- vance in bringing the bulk of orchestral music performance materials currently available in commerce under informal bib- liographic control, but it should not be taken as the complete and final authority on what happened to be available at the time the book went to press. The editor/compiler's total reliance upon secondary sources of information has resulted in pervasive small ambiguities, and some sizeable lacunae. It leaps to the eye, for example, that most (if not all) of Universal Edition's for-sale orchestra music is not listed. A major gap is in the production of Haydn-Mozart Presse, Salzburg, whose performance ma- terials are in many cases the only modern edition of a Haydn symphony available in parts. That's a block of more than fifty symphonic works of major importance left

    out of Farish's compilation. Single works of many periods also omitted here but known by the reviewer to be available are too many to bear enumeration.

    Music published for avowedly education- al purposes has been isolated in a separate section of sixty pages at the back of the book. This list is also made available separately, and should be of consuming interest to secondary school and university orchestra directors. The publisher/agency directory is as accurate as it could be in a volatile marketplace. The publisher promises annual supplements to the entire series, which should also serve as an oppor- tunity for the repair of omissions from the main volumes.

    Competent music retailers and all or- chestral librarians will find immediate ap- plication for Orchestral Music in Print. In eliminating searching time, they will find it a decided bargain at the price. Although at the level of individual entries, it preserves the vagaries of music publishers' catalogues whole, it eliminates their often arbitrary listings by medium. Of equal importance, it replaces those highly non-uniform ranks of catalogues on the shelf (or in the file drawer) with a relatively compact and con- sistent single source.

    JOHN D. WISER Radio WDST, Woodstock, New York

    Dictionnaire des editeurs de musique franVais. Tome I: Des origines a en- viron 1820. Edited by Anik Devries and Francois Lesure. (Archives de l'e- dition musicale frangaise, 4.) Geneva: Editions Minkoff, 1979. [2 vols.; 280.00F]

    In his pioneering study of the Parisian music publishing trade, A Dictionary of Parisian music publishers, 1700-1950 (Lon- don, 1954), Cecil Hopkinson concluded his introduction with the hope that his work would not have to wait fifty years until a second edition was called for. In fact only one year later Cari Johansson's important study of a more select group of French publishers, French music publishers'catalogues of the second half of the eighteenth century (Stockholm, 1955), was issued. But it has taken twenty-five years for a new dictionary of French music publishers to appear.

    out of Farish's compilation. Single works of many periods also omitted here but known by the reviewer to be available are too many to bear enumeration.

    Music published for avowedly education- al purposes has been isolated in a separate section of sixty pages at the back of the book. This list is also made available separately, and should be of consuming interest to secondary school and university orchestra directors. The publisher/agency directory is as accurate as it could be in a volatile marketplace. The publisher promises annual supplements to the entire series, which should also serve as an oppor- tunity for the repair of omissions from the main volumes.

    Competent music retailers and all or- chestral librarians will find immediate ap- plication for Orchestral Music in Print. In eliminating searching time, they will find it a decided bargain at the price. Although at the level of individual entries, it preserves the vagaries of music publishers' catalogues whole, it eliminates their often arbitrary listings by medium. Of equal importance, it replaces those highly non-uniform ranks of catalogues on the shelf (or in the file drawer) with a relatively compact and con- sistent single source.

    JOHN D. WISER Radio WDST, Woodstock, New York

    Dictionnaire des editeurs de musique franVais. Tome I: Des origines a en- viron 1820. Edited by Anik Devries and Francois Lesure. (Archives de l'e- dition musicale frangaise, 4.) Geneva: Editions Minkoff, 1979. [2 vols.; 280.00F]

    In his pioneering study of the Parisian music publishing trade, A Dictionary of Parisian music publishers, 1700-1950 (Lon- don, 1954), Cecil Hopkinson concluded his introduction with the hope that his work would not have to wait fifty years until a second edition was called for. In fact only one year later Cari Johansson's important study of a more select group of French publishers, French music publishers'catalogues of the second half of the eighteenth century (Stockholm, 1955), was issued. But it has taken twenty-five years for a new dictionary of French music publishers to appear.

    out of Farish's compilation. Single works of many periods also omitted here but known by the reviewer to be available are too many to bear enumeration.

    Music published for avowedly education- al purposes has been isolated in a separate section of sixty pages at the back of the book. This list is also made available separately, and should be of consuming interest to secondary school and university orchestra directors. The publisher/agency directory is as accurate as it could be in a volatile marketplace. The publisher promises annual supplements to the entire series, which should also serve as an oppor- tunity for the repair of omissions from the main volumes.

    Competent music retailers and all or- chestral librarians will find immediate ap- plication for Orchestral Music in Print. In eliminating searching time, they will find it a decided bargain at the price. Although at the level of individual entries, it preserves the vagaries of music publishers' catalogues whole, it eliminates their often arbitrary listings by medium. Of equal importance, it replaces those highly non-uniform ranks of catalogues on the shelf (or in the file drawer) with a relatively compact and con- sistent single source.

    JOHN D. WISER Radio WDST, Woodstock, New York

    Dictionnaire des editeurs de musique franVais. Tome I: Des origines a en- viron 1820. Edited by Anik Devries and Francois Lesure. (Archives de l'e- dition musicale frangaise, 4.) Geneva: Editions Minkoff, 1979. [2 vols.; 280.00F]

    In his pioneering study of the Parisian music publishing trade, A Dictionary of Parisian music publishers, 1700-1950 (Lon- don, 1954), Cecil Hopkinson concluded his introduction with the hope that his work would not have to wait fifty years until a second edition was called for. In fact only one year later Cari Johansson's important study of a more select group of French publishers, French music publishers'catalogues of the second half of the eighteenth century (Stockholm, 1955), was issued. But it has taken twenty-five years for a new dictionary of French music publishers to appear.

    61 61 61

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  • MLA Notes, September 1980 MLA Notes, September 1980

    The work at hand, called volume 1 in two parts, covers the period from the be- ginning of French music publishing in the 1520s to about 1820. Its raison d'etre, as with the earlier publications, is two-fold. Most simply it provides us with a basic summary of historical information about the many firms which produced French music publications during this time. More important, it helps us to solve the perenially vexing problem of dating these firms' output. In France as in much of western Europe, the development of music printing from engraved plates provided the means for reissuing editions at moderate cost. But this was coupled with the temptation for the publisher to omit dates from his plates, thus disguising the age of his product....

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