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  • TYPOGRAPHY - FORMAT - PRINT

    THE QUICK BROWN FOX JUDGED A BOOK BY ITS COVER

    An investigative look at inspiring typography, format and print processes for publications.

    HAzEl GAGE

  • INTRODUCTION - 3

    Layout is often the primary though for design application when it comes to publication design. However, there are aspects often overlooked which enhance a design to become something appropriate as a deliverable as well as a nice layout which is engaging. Typography choice is often considered, though we could be more adventurous without typeface choices. Detail are some designer who appreciate letterforms and even though are not necessarily have an application on publications currently, there is no reason why not. Format is a difficult thing to change and can add a substantial cost to a project, but it is one aspect of design which engages the audience to interact with a product is it appear new or tangibly different. Print is an obvious chapter, but so often stock is not considered or the process of production. We get stuck in our ways, when another method would suit the brief more effectively. DIY sections are included to aid any designer in tackling these elements. Considering the smaller details are as important as a good layout.

    CONTENTS

    04 - TYPOGRAPHY06 - Typography Basics08 - Dalton Maag 14 - Demian Conrad18 - Typeface to font22 - Kellerhouse

    26 - FORMAT28 - Paper sizes30 - Ultimate Holding Company38 - Spin44 - Is Not Magazine48 - Binding Basics

    50 - PRINT52 - Build58 - Printing methods60 - Because66 - Berg70 - Importance of stock

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 4

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 5

    TYPOGRAPHYThe three showcased designers selected to feature in the typography section are great at communicating for their specific audience and brief. Even though they are not specific publication typeface designers, and each have different approaches to typeface design, they demonstrate how the application of display fonts can be effective throughout different formats and allow any project to become a memorable piece of design. With the DIY sections, you can understand the basics of typography and go on further to create your own font.

    DIY - TYPOGRAPHY BASICSDAlTON MAAG INTERVIEWDEMIAN CONRAD DESIGN FEATUREDIY - TYPEFACE TO FONTKEllERHOUSE SHOWCASE

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 6

    DAlTON MAAGDalton Maag are a superior design studio offering unique and bespoke fonts to massive corporations alongside existing fonts for purchase. Even though they deal with big names, the creativity is still fresh and inspiring. I had a great opportunity to see Bruno Maag talk at the Manchester Notes to Self 2012 and admire his passion for perfection.

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 7

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 8

    INTERVIEW - BRUNO MAAGMARCH 20TH 2012

    How would you describe the typography Dalton Maag produces? Most of our work has been for corporate clients and, accordingly, most of our work tends to be quite conservative and traditional. Our work also stems from my firm belief that type and typography is first and foremost about functionality - to convey a thought via the means of written communication. I dont think that the designers grand self expression has much room in that. Naturally, this has to be taken with a pinch of salt since fonts for display have a different functionality - they mean to attract the viewer to themselves, with the message being read once the eye sits on the type. Personally, though, I do think that even in display type there is an inherent call for visual functionality. The letters have to work in harmony to ensure the reader can absorb the message without too much effort.

    Are there specific values which Dalton Maag as a studio stay true to when pitching for and accepting briefs? Well, the main one is whether the client pays enough or not. If a client is not prepared to pay my fees I am not interested in working with them because they clearly dont appreciate my skills and knowledge. Also, I would find it difficult to work for a dictator, and maybe the Tory party.

    Do you have any rituals or customs which you make you more progressive and productive which you try to adhere to when designing? I have to let my work ferment in my head first. It usually takes me a few days of mulling over a brief before I put pencil to paper. I do prefer a quiet work environment, though.

    As you know, I am inspired by your work, which designers or studios inspire you? In type design, I do like the fonts that Christian Schwartz designed for The Guardian - that is about the only project that created envy. I think Adrian Frutiger is a Guru and Matthew Carter isnt half bad either. There are a number of young designers which do some great work like Christian, or Kris Sowersby from New Zealand.

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 901 - KNIGHT FRANK02 - UBUNTU

    In graphic design I am in awe of the work by North Design. Everything they do is good. There is nothing pretentious about it, and its because they, too, recognise design as a means to enhance functionality.

    Is there one piece which continually inspires you, or made you interested in a typographic career? No, for me it all started with my apprenticeship as a typesetter. It was entering a printing office that did it for me, and the world of printing continues to fascinate me. Although we have only just entered the digital universe, I find it a bit bland. For me, it doesnt engage all the senses, such as physical printing does.

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  • TYPOGRAPHY - 10

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  • TYPOGRAPHY - 11

    With the speed of computers, is there still a place for pen and paper when designing typefaces? To be honest, we work mostly on the computer. Paper and pencil do have their use, at the very beginning, when I start sketching and doodling ideas. Its quicker than doing that on paper and often by the innate inaccuracy of sketching I discover other things that inform the final design. However, when it comes to start defining the features and concepts, and certainly once we start drawing up the full character set, its all done on computer.

    Do you always design typefaces for a specific client and brief, or do you sometimes create something with no specified starting point? Most of our work answers a client brief, often quite tightly defined. Its only our own library fonts that begin with less of an idea what we want to do. They sometimes come from doodling around and once I see a shape that is interesting I follow that trail. Depending what comes of it I then define the brief around that.

    What has the most enjoyable and rewarding project produced by Dalton Maag? The most rewarding was to create a font family for Ubuntu, the open source project. It is great to know that a high quality typeface can now be accessed by millions of people around the world, for free. I admire Mark Shuttleworth, founder of the Ubuntu community, for putting his money where his mouth is, and recognising the value of typography in a wider world. The most enjoyable is what we currently work on - the font family for Nokia. It is a huge learning curve because when the project is finished we will have created about 15 different script systems that cover over 80% of all the languages spoken on this planet, all with one design expression. This will be a first.

    01 - UBUNTU02 - NOKIA03 - CENTRAl SCHOOl OF SPEECH AND DRAMA

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 12

    DIY -

    TYPOGRAPHY BASICS

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 13

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 14

    DEMIAN CONRADBased in Lausanne, Switzerland, Demian Conrad Design Studio work primarily for the culture sector. Demian Conrad was himself a typographer for 4 years before setting up the studio and since then the studio has developed an interest in research led design and new technologies and printing processes. Currently, Demian Conrad is exploring alternative methods that use traditional printing and new cutting-edge digital printing techniques.

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 15

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 16

    DIY -

    TYPEFACE TO FONT

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 17

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 18

    DESIGN FEATURE - MERCAlIBROTEXT FROM DEMIAN CONRAD

    Mercalibro is a second hand market that runs once a month in Bellinzona. For the 10th anniversary we created the slogan and the idea Dieci anni di libri because we wanted to add values to the old books. It is an annual campaign with F4 street posters and 12 monthly A3 posters. All the communication is based on a huge ornamental typography composition.

    Client Ondemedia

    Deliverables Poster F4, poster A3, flyer A5, shopping bag, quality labels, cardboard box installation.

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  • TYPOGRAPHY - 19

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    01 - MERCAlIBRO02 - MERCAlIBRO03 - MERCAlIBRO04 - MERCAlIBRO

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 20

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  • TYPOGRAPHY - 21

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    01 - lETTERA 902 - lETTERA 903 - GABBANI04 - GABBANI

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 22

    KEllERHOUSENeil Kellerhouse is a remarkable film poster designer. He takes the content of the film and truly tells the story in a still, visual manner. The use of bespoke typography reflects the independent films and the desire to create something worth watching.

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 23

  • TYPOGRAPHY - 24

    SHOWCASE - FIlM POSTERSTEXT FROM BAllISTA MAGAzINE

    As we understand it, the challenge to designing a movie poster is overcoming the vernacular Hollywood uses to market their films. The industry relies on a set of