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  • DAVIDSONS PHILOSOPHYAND

    CHINESE PHILOSOPHY

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  • PHILOSOPHY

    OF

    HISTORY AND CULTURE

    Series Editor

    Michael Krausz, Bryn Mawr College

    Advisory Board

    Annette Baier (University of Pittsburgh), Cora Diamond (University ofVirginia), William Dray (University of Ottawa), Nancy Fraser (North-western University), Clifford Geertz (Institute for Advanced Study,Princeton), Peter Hacker (St. Johns College, Oxford), Rom Harr (LinacreCollege, Oxford), Bernard Harrison (University of Utah), MarthaNussbaum (University of Chicago), Leon Pompa (University of Birmingham),Joseph Raz (Balliol College, Oxford), Amlie Oksenberg Rorty (BrandeisUniversity), Georg Henrik Von Wright (University of Helsinki)

    VOLUME 23

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  • BRILLLEIDEN BOSTON

    2006

    DAVIDSONS PHILOSOPHYAND

    CHINESE PHILOSOPHYConstructive Engagement

    EDITED BY

    BO MOU

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  • This book is printed on acid-free paper.

    Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data

    Davidsons philosophy and Chinese philosophy : constructive engagement / edited byBo Mou.

    p. cm. (Philosophy of history and culture ISSN 0922-6001 ; 23)Includes bibliographical references and index.ISBN 90-04-15048-X (alk. paper)1. Philosophy, Chinese. 2. Davidson, Donald, 1917- I. Mou, Bo, 1956- II. Series.

    B126.D34 2006191dc22

    2005058174

    ISSN 09226001ISBN-13: 978-90-04-15048-5ISBN-10: 90-04-15048-X

    Copyright 2006 by Koninklijke Brill NV, Leiden, The NetherlandsKoninklijke Brill NV incorporates the imprints Brill Academic Publishers,

    Martinus Nijhoff Publishers and VSP.

    All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, translated, stored ina retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic,mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise, without prior written

    permission from the publisher.

    Authorization to photocopy items for internal or personaluse is granted by Brill provided that

    the appropriate fees are paid directly to The CopyrightClearance Center, 222 Rosewood Drive, Suite 910

    Danvers MA 01923, USA.Fees are subject to change.

    PRINTED IN THE NETHERLANDS

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  • In memory of Donald Davidson (19172003), who inspired and participated in the project

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  • CONTENTS

    Acknowledgments ........................................................................ xiNote on Transcription ................................................................ xvContributors ................................................................................ xvii

    How Constructive Engagement of Davidsons Philosophy and Chinese Philosophy is Possible: A Theme Introduction .......................................................... 1Bo Mou

    PART ONE

    CONCEPTUAL SCHEMES, RELATIVISM, AND CROSS-CULTURAL UNDERSTANDING

    Chapter One Relativism and Its Schemes ............................ 37Michael Krausz

    Chapter Two Davidson and Chinese Conceptual Scheme .................................................................................... 55Koji Tanaka

    Chapter Three Making Room for Comparative Philosophy: Davidson, Brandom, and Conceptual Distance .................................................................................. 73Stephen C. Angle

    PART TWO

    PRINCIPLE OF CHARITY AND CHINESE PHILOSOPHY

    Chapter Four Where Charity Begins .................................... 103David B. Wong

    Chapter Five Davidsons Charity in the Context of Chinese Philosophy ................................................................ 117Yiu-ming Fung

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  • viii contents

    PART THREE

    RATIONALITY, NORMATIVITY, AND INTER-CULTURAL DISAGREEMENT

    Chapter Six Davidsonian Rationality and Ethical Disagreement between Cultures ............................................ 165Samuel C. Wheeler

    Chapter Seven A Davidsonian Approach to Normativity and the Limits of Cross-Cultural Interpretation .................. 189Yujian Zheng

    PART FOUR

    MEANING AND INTERPRETATION

    Chapter Eight On Two Kinds of Meaning and Interpretation .......................................................................... 207A.P. Martinich

    Chapter Nine Metaphorical Use versus Metaphorical Essence: Examples from Chinese Philosophy ...................... 229Kim-chong Chong

    Chapter Ten Reading the Analects with Davidson: Mood, Force, and Communicative Practice in Early China .......... 247Yang Xiao

    PART FIVE

    TRUTH CONCERN AND DAO CONCERN

    Chapter Eleven From Donald Davidsons Use of Convention T to Meaning and Truth in Chinese Language ................................................................................ 271Chung-ying Cheng

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  • contents ix

    Chapter Twelve Truth Pursuit and Dao Pursuit: From Davidsons Approach to Classical Daoist Approach in View of the Thesis of Truth as Strategic Normative Goal ........................................................................................ 309Bo Mou

    Index ............................................................................................ 351

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  • ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

    My deep appreciation goes to late Professor Donald Davidson whosethought and style of doing philosophy, and whose valuable partici-pation at the earlier stages of this anthology project, as explained inmy theme introduction below, have significantly inspired and con-tributed to the project.

    I am very grateful to all the other contributing authors of this vol-ume for their valuable contributions, all of which are previouslyunpublished pieces written expressly for this book, and for theirpatience, cooperation, and understanding throughout the process,during which I have learnt a lot from them in various aspects. Theirpersistent support of this project and of this editors efforts havebecome especially valuable when Donald Davidson passed away atone important stage of this project, as Davidsons participation inthis project in several ways is one of the main momentums for ourreflective efforts in this constructive-engagement project. I am espe-cially indebted to Michael Krausz not merely for his role as an activecontributing participant but also for his timely and effective help indetermining a decent academic publisher like Brill.

    To effectively fulfill the constructive-engagement purpose, thisanthology project is accompanied with its conference project to pro-vide a critical discussion and engagement platform. In this way,although the anthology project per se is an independent project insteadof the conference proceedings, the latter is rather one indispensablestage for the sake of fulfilling the goal of this anthology and for thesake of effectively implementing the constructive-engagement strat-egy. During the whole process of preparing for the anthology pro-ject including its closely related conference project as one crucialstage of critical engagement platform, we have received a largeamount of support, help and assistance in various ways from vari-ous parties. During the process of reviewing the submissions, I amgrateful to Wan-Chuan Fang, Yiu-ming Fung and Linhe Han fortheir valuable review work and their precious time. I am grateful toXianglong Zhang, my colleague in the 20022005 board of theInternational Society for Comparative Studies of Chinese and WesternPhilosophy (ISCWP), for his persistent support since the conference

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  • xii acknowledgments

    project became the first one in the ISCWP constructive engage-ment international conference series. I am thankful to the Instituteof Foreign Philosophy, Peking University, China, for its assumingthe conference host for the originally-scheduled August-2003 con-ference, which had to be postponed due to the SARS outreach inspring 2003; I am especially grateful to Linhe Han for his activerole as the conference-host representative in coordinating variouspreparations. I am grateful to the Institute of Philosophy, ChineseAcademy of Social Sciences for its assuming the conference host forthe re-scheduled June-2004 conference; I am thankful to PengchengLi, Deputy Director of the Institute of Philosophy, CASS, and JingSun, Director of its Research Coordination Office, for their sub-stantial support; I am especially grateful to He Li for his active roleas the conference-host representative in coordinating various prepa-rations. I am grateful to those speakers other than the contributorsto this volume, Bo Cheng, Wan-Chuan Fang, Yi Jiang and ChuangYe for their valuable and engaging talks at the conference. My sin-cere thanks also go to Lian Cheng, He Li, Jian Li, and Xiwen Luofor their helpful and effective professional service as the conferencesession chairs, and to Jigang Shan, Jihong Lei and Xiaojian Zhangfor their effective logistics supports for the conference.

    I am indebted to the American Philosophical AssociationsCommittee on International Cooperation (CIC), under the leader-ship of its chair Alan M. Olson, for its valuable support and co-sponsorship for the above mentioned international conference projecton Davidsons philosophy and Chinese philosophy during 20022004when I served as a member of the CIC.

    I am grateful to Roger Ames, Editor of the journal Philosophy Eastand West, and He Li, Editor of the Chinese journal World Philosophy,for their valuable support and help in setting