common core state standards for english language arts and literacy in history/ social studies,...

Download Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/ Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

Post on 01-Jan-2016

213 views

Category:

Documents

1 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

Slide 1

Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/ Social Studies, Science, and Technical SubjectsTo better understand how the LDC framework functions, lets briefly examine the structure of the CCSS and discuss the literacy elements that support instruction in the content areas.

Although the CCSS only address literacy in history/social studies, science, and technical subjects, its easy to see how many of the skills/concepts described could apply to other content areas.

Keep in mind, the standards were looking at today relate to literacy, not content; they link literacy skills that enhance learning to content.1CCSS Design2Building on the strength of current state standards, the CCSS are designed to be:

Focused, coherent, clear and rigorousInternationally benchmarkedAnchored in college and career readiness* (CCR)Evidence and research based

Common Core State StandardsDo Not ProvideA complete scope and sequence.A course outline.All the essential skills and knowledge students could have.DoOutline the most essential skills and knowledge every student needs to master to be college and career-ready.Distribute responsibility for students literacy development.

3Sections blind in on click

Do:CCSS tell the whats --- but not the howsEnglish Language Arts --- and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

Do Not:Not the howsNot a pacing guideNot all inclusive of what students could be taught

3Teacher and Student SkillsAs you view this presentation, identify the skills necessary for teachers and students to successfully implement the CCSS. Skills for:TeachersStudents

Guiding Question:How do you engage students in reading and responding to complex texts in your discipline?

6Design and OrganizationThree main sections:K5 (cross-disciplinary)612 English Language Arts612 Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects

Shared responsibility for students literacy development

Three appendicesA: Research and evidence; glossary of key termsB: Reading text exemplars; sample performance tasksC: Annotated student writing samples6 Four StrandsReading:a. Literatureb. Informationalc. FoundationsWritingListening and SpeakingLanguage

7The CCSS for English/Language Arts & Literacy in History/ Social Studies, Science and Technical Subjects are organized around four strands.

There are three sub-strands in reading:- Literature- Informational - Foundations

7Grade and Standard

K - With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.1stAsk and answer questions about key details in a text.

2nd Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

Deconstructing Reading Anchor Standard One

Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.8(No prompting)This is intended to model for participants what they will be doing with Anchor Standard One for argumentation.The facilitator should use the slides to demonstrate how each grade level standard builds upon the previous one.The highlighted text identifies the change in demand from one grade level to the next.82nd Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.3rd Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.4th Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.5th Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

9Grade and Standard95th Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.6th Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.7th Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.8th Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

10Grade and Standard8th Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.9th/10th Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.11th/12thCite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

11Grade and Standard12Overview of Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical SubjectsReading Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical SubjectsKnowledge of domain-specific vocabulary Analyze, evaluate, and differentiate primary and secondary sources Synthesize quantitative and technical information, including facts presented in maps, timelines, flowcharts, or diagramsWriting Standards for History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical SubjectsWrite arguments on discipline-specific content and informative/explanatory textsUse of data, evidence, and reason to support arguments and claims Use of domain-specific vocabulary

Discuss content area literacy standards.12

13[Slide inserted; not part of original presentation from Achieve.]

13 2009 Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation14

[Slide inserted; not part of original presentation from Achieve.]

14 2009 Bill & Melinda Gates FoundationCCSS & State Standards for Your DisciplineThink about the state standards for your discipline and the CCSS Literacy Standards.Discuss at your table how these two sets of standards will interact.Create a content example of melding the standards into one lesson.15

16Goals of LDCTo engage students in reading, comprehending, analyzing, interpreting, and responding to complex textsTo align assignments to the College and Career Readiness Standards within the CCSS and to promote collaborationTo help teachers personalize learning so that every student can master the CCSSTo ensure that all students can be college and career readyModulesModules wrap a teaching plan around the task.Courses17Example Talking Points: So once a task is designed, what needs to happen in order for students to successfully complete the task? That is where modules come in.

Example Talking Points:Modules were never meant to stand alone. The goal is to use the modules as a system; whether within courses, across courses or across grades. And also as a large instructional strategy so that reading and writing skills and student product demands are scaffolded. Modules can be: inserted into existing courses, or used as the basis for new courses. repeated, using different content, when students need more than one try to develop skills. well address course later in our LDC experience.

17A Complete Example

18What are the LDC tools? The bank of reading/writing tasksThe module template TasksSkills InstructionResultsScoring rubrics Local and national collaboration Access to a community of educators with LDC modules aligned to course content and to CCSS

19LDC Framework 10-17-11What are the three typesof writing tasks? Argumentation HS-40%, MS-35%2. Informational/explanatory HS-40%, MS-35%3. Narrative HS-20%, MS-30%

20LDC Framework 10-17-11Tasks are organized into three main sections: Argumentation; Information/explanatory; and Narrative.

Each task set includes a list of the standards addressed: the template prompts and a generic rubric (tied to the process elements of the tasks, not the content of the task).20 2009 Bill & Melinda Gates FoundationLDC Writing Task vs. Traditional Writing PromptAs you view the next slides, jot down the differences between the LDC writing tasks and the traditional writing prompts.

Which one is more rigorous?Which one is more engaging?21LDC Framework 10-17-11Source: East Jessamine High School; Kentucky LDC22ELALDC Task vs. Traditional Writing Prompt22 2009 Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Career/Technical TaskLDC Task vs. Traditional Writing Prompt23LDC Framework 10-17-11Chart participant responses to the 23ScienceLDC Task vs. Traditional Writing PromptSource: East Jessamine High School, Kentucky LDC24LDC Framework 10-17-11Source: East Jessamine High School; Kentucky LDC25Social StudiesLDC Task vs. Traditional Writing Prompt

Recommended

View more >