Clavicle Fracture (Broken Collarbone) A broken collarbone is also

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<ul><li><p>175 Cambridge Street Boston, MA 02114 </p><p>617-726-7500 www2.massgeneral.org/sports </p><p>Clavicle Fracture (Broken Collarbone) </p><p>A broken collarbone is also known as a clavicle fracture. This is a very common fracture that occurs in people of all ages. </p><p>Anatomy The collarbone (clavicle) is located between the ribcage (sternum) and the shoulder blade (scapula), and it connects the arm to the body. The clavicle lies above several important nerves and blood vessels. However, these vital structures are rarely injured when the clavicle breaks, even though the bone ends can shift when they are fractured. Description The clavicle is a long bone and most breaks occur in the middle of it. Occasionally, the bone will break where it attaches at the ribcage or shoulder blade. Cause Clavicle fractures are often caused by a direct blow to the shoulder. This can happen during a fall onto the shoulder or a car collision. A fall onto an outstretched arm can also cause a clavicle fracture. In babies, these fractures can occur during the passage through the birth canal. Symptoms Clavicle fractures can be very painful and may make it hard to move your arm. Additional symptoms include: </p><p> Sagging shoulder (down and forward) Inability to lift the arm because of pain A grinding sensation if an attempt is made to raise the arm A deformity or "bump" over the break Bruising, swelling, and/or tenderness over the collarbone </p><p>Nonsurgical Treatment If the broken ends of the bones have not shifted out of place and line up correctly, you may not need surgery. Broken collarbones can heal without surgery. Arm Support A simple arm sling or figure-of-eight wrap is usually used for comfort immediately after the break. These are worn to support your arm and help keep it in position while it heals. Medication Pain medication, including acetaminophen, can help relieve pain as the fracture heals. Physical Therapy While you are wearing the sling, you will likely lose muscle strength in your shoulder. Once your bone begins to heal, the pain will decrease and your doctor may start gentle shoulder and elbow exercises. These exercises will help prevent stiffness and weakness. More strenuous exercises can gradually be started once the fracture is completely healed. Doctor Follow-Up You will need to see your doctor regularly until your fracture heals. He or she will examine you and take x-rays to make sure the bone is healing in good position. After the bone has healed, you will be able to gradually return to your normal activities. </p></li><li><p>175 Cambridge Street Boston, MA 02114 </p><p>617-726-7500 www2.massgeneral.org/sports </p><p>Complications The fracture can move out of place before it heals. It is important to follow up with your doctor as scheduled to make sure the bone stays in position. If the fracture fragments do move out of place and the bones heal in that position, it is called a "malunion." Treatment for this is determined by how far out of place the bones are and how much this affects your arm movement. A large bump over the fracture site may develop as the fracture heals. This usually gets smaller over time, but a small bump may remain permanently. Surgical Treatment If your bones are out of place (displaced), your doctor may recommend surgery. Surgery can align the bones exactly and hold them in good position while they heal. This can improve shoulder strength when you have recovered. Plates and Screws During this operation, the bone fragments are first repositioned into their normal alignment, and then held in place with special screws and/or by attaching metal plates to the outer surface of the bone. After surgery, you may notice a small patch of numb skin below the incision. This numbness will become less noticeable with time. Because there is not a lot of fat over the collarbone, you may be able to feel the plate through your skin. Plates and screws are usually not removed after the bone has healed, unless they are causing discomfort. Problems with the hardware are not common, but sometimes, seatbelts and backpacks can irritate the collarbone area. If this happens, the hardware can be removed after the fracture has healed. Pins Pins are also used to hold the fracture in good position after the bone ends have been put back in place. The incisions for pin placement are usually smaller than those used for plates. Pins often irritate the skin where they have been inserted and are usually removed once the fracture has healed. Rehabilitation Specific exercises will help restore movement and strengthen your shoulder. Your doctor may provide you with a home therapy plan or suggest that you work with a physical therapist. Therapy programs typically start with gentle motion exercises. Your doctor will gradually add strengthening exercises to your program as your fracture heals. Outcome Whether your treatment involves surgery or not, it can take several months for your collarbone to heal. It may take longer in diabetics or people who smoke or chew tobacco. Most people return to regular activities within 3 months of their injury. Your doctor will tell you when your injury is stable enough to do so. Returning to regular activities or lifting with your arm before your doctor advises may cause your fracture fragments to move or your hardware to break. This may require you to start your treatment from the beginning. Once your fracture has completely healed, you can safely return to sports activities. Text is Copyright 1995-2012 by the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.. Illustrations Copyright 2008 Idaho Sports Medicine Institute. </p></li><li><p>175 Cambridge Street Boston, MA 02114 </p><p>617-643-9999 www.mghsportsmedicine.org </p><p> Rehabilitation after Clavicle Fracture Phase One: 0 to 6 weeks after surgery Goals: 1. Protect the fractured clavicle2. Prevent shoulder stiffness 3. Regain range of motion 4. Control pain and swelling Activities: 1. Sling Use your sling most of the time for the first 2 weeks. The doctor will give you additional instructions on the use of the sling at your post-operative office visit. Remove the sling 4 or 5 times a day to do pendulum exercises. 2. Use of the injured arm Do not elevate injured arm above 90 degrees in any plane for the first 6 weeks post-op. Do not lift any objects over 1 or 2 pounds with the injured arm for the first 6 weeks. Avoid excsessive reaching and external/internal rotation for the first 6 weeks. 3. Showering You may shower or bath and wash the incision area. To wash under the injured arm, bend over at the waist and let the arm passively come away from the body. It is safe to wash under the arm in this position. This is the same position as the pendulum exercise. Exercise Program ICE Days per Week: 7 as necessary 15- 20 minutes Times per Day: 4-5 STRETCHING / PASSIVE MOTION Days per Week: 7 Times per day: 4-5 Program: Pendulum exercises Supine External Rotation Supine assisted arm elevation limit to 90 degrees Isometric exercises: internal and external rotation at neutral Elbow and forearm exercises Ball squeeze exercise Scapular retraction Office Visit Call 617-726-7500 to reach your doctor; 617-643-9999 to reach MGH Sports Physical Therapy. </p></li><li><p>175 Cambridge Street Boston, MA 02114 </p><p>617-643-9999 www.mghsportsmedicine.org </p><p>Rehabilitation after Clavicle Fracture Phase two: 7 to 12 weeks after surgery Goals: 1. Protect the clavicle fracture 2. Improve range of motion of the shoulder 3. Begin gentle strengthening Activities 1. Sling Your sling is no longer necessary unless your doctor instructs you to continue using it (use it for comfort only). 2. Use of the operated arm You can now move your arm for most daily activities, but you need to continue to be careful not to lift objects heavier than 1 or 2 pounds. You should avoid forceful pushing or pulling activities. You should continue to avoid reaching behind you or other positions with the hand behind the head. 3. Bathing and showering Continue to follow the instructions from phase one and the instructions above. Exercise Program </p><p>STRENGTHENING / THERABAND Internal and External rotation</p><p>STRETCHING / ACTIVE MOTION Days per week: 7 Times per day: 1 to 3 Supine External Rotation Standing External Rotation Prone row Supine assisted arm elevation Prone extension Arm Elevation in scapular plane Behind the back internal rotation (limit beltline) Horizontal adduction(active reach only) Isotonic biceps curl </p><p>Biceps curl Row Forward punch (Serratus punch) STRENGTHENING / DYNAMIC Side lying ER </p><p>Prone Ts Prone Ys Standing scaption </p><p>Hands behind-the-head stretch ER @ 90 abduction stretch Proprioception drills </p><p>Rhythmic stabilization Scapulohumeral Rhythm exercises </p><p>Side lying IR @ 90 Call 617-726-7500 to reach your doctor; 617-643-9999 to reach MGH Sports Physical Therapy. </p></li><li><p>175 Cambridge Street Boston, MA 02114 </p><p>617-643-9999 www.mghsportsmedicine.org </p><p>Rehabilitation after Clavicle Fracture Phase Three: starting 13 to 18 weeks after surgery </p><p> Goals: 1. Protect the clavicle fracture 2. Regain full range of motion 3. Continue strengthening progression Activities: Use of the operated arm You may now safely use the arm for normal daily activities involved with dressing, bathing and self-care. You may raise the arm away from the body; however, you should not raise the arm when carrying objects greater than one pound. Any forceful pushing or pulling activities could still disrupt the healing of your fracture. Continue to avoid lifting weighted objects overhead Exercise Program: STRETCHING / RANGE OF MOTION Days per week: 7 Times per day: 1-2 Pendulum exercises Standing External Rotation / Doorway Wall slide Stretch Hands-behind-head stretch Standing Forward Flexion Behind the back internal rotation Supine Cross-Chest Stretch Side lying internal rotation (sleeper stretch) External rotation at 90 Abduction stretch STRENGTHENING / THERABAND Days per week: 7 Times per day: 1 External Rotation Internal Rotation Standing Forward Punch Dynamic hug Seated Row Biceps curl Ws </p><p> STRENGTHENING / DYNAMIC Days per week: 7 Times per day: 1 Side-lying External Rotation Prone Horizontal Arm Raises Ts Prone row Prone scaption Ys Prone extension Standing forward flexion full-can scaption Add progressive resistance 1 to 5 lb Rhythmic stabilization and proprioceptive training drills with physical therapist Limited weight training can begin week 16 per doctor</p><p> Call 617-726-7500 to reach your doctor; 617-643-9999 to reach MGH Sports Physical Therapy. </p></li><li><p>175 Cambridge Street Boston, MA 02114 </p><p>617-643-9999 www.mghsportsmedicine.org </p><p> Rehabilitation after Clavicle Fracture Phase Four: starting 19 to 28 weeks after surgery Goals: 1. Progression of functional activities 2. Maintain full range of motion 3. Continue progressive strengthening 4. Advance sports and recreational activity per surgeon Exercise Program STRETCHING / RANGE OF MOTION Days per week: 5-7 Times per day: 1 Continue all exercises from phase 3 STRENGTHENING / THERABAND Days per week: 3 Times per day: 1 Continue from phase 3 STRENGTHENING / DYNAMIC Days per week: 3 Times per day: 1 Continue from phase 3 PLYOMETRIC PROGRAM Usually for throwing and overhead athletes Days per week and times per day per physical therapist Rebounder throws with arm at side Wall dribbles overhead Rebounder throwing/weighted ball Deceleration drills with weighted ball Wall dribbles at 90 Wall dribble circles WEIGHT TRAINING Consult Doctor and Physical Therapist INTERVAL SPORT PROGRAMS See individual programs for golf, tennis, swimming and throwing. Call 617-726-7500 to reach your doctor; 617-643-9999 to reach MGH Sports Physical Therapy. </p></li><li><p>175 Cambridge Street Boston, MA 02114 </p><p>617-643-9999 www.mghsportsmedicine.org </p><p> Rehabilitation Guidelines after Clavicle Fracture </p><p>Post-injury phase Sling Range of Motion </p><p> Therapeutic exercises Precautions </p><p>Phase 1 0 to 6 weeks after injury Goals: *Allow healing of fractured clavicle *Initiate early protected and restricted range of motion. *Minimize muscular atrophy. *Decrease pain/inflammation. * Ice shoulder 3-5 times (15 minutes each time) per day to control swelling and inflammation. </p><p>Per MD instructions. An arm sling/support is used for 6 weeks post-op whenever standing </p><p> *Flexion to 90 degrees as tolerated *ER @ 0 as tolerated, *IR and ER@ 90 to 45 *No IR behind back, *No horizontal adduction </p><p>No stretching 0-6 weeks *Pendulum exercises *Supine forward flexion with wand to 90 * shoulder abduction limit 90 *Supine ER at neutral *Scapular retraction </p><p>*Isometrics: ER, IR, FLX, EXT, ABD *Ball squeeze *Elbow and forearm exercises *Theraband exercises ER, IR (limit IR to neutral) </p><p>-DO NOT let weight of arm pull on shoulder x 6 weeks -DO NOT elevate surgical arm above 90 degrees in any plane for the first 6 weeks post-op. -DO NOT lift any objects over 5 pounds with the arm for the first 6 weeks. -AVOID EXCESSIVE reaching and external/internal rotation for the first 6 weeks. </p><p>Phase 2 7 to 12 weeks after injury Goals: *Gradually restore range of motion *Increase strength *Improve neuromuscular control *Enhance proprioception and kinesthesia </p><p>D/C </p><p>*In general, increase ROMs in increments of 15 per week *Shoulder flexion and abduction to tolerance (full by week 12) *Horizontal adduction active only *progressive IR and ER as tolerated </p><p>*Gradually improve ROM all planes *Elevation in scapular plane *Wall slide *IR behind back to beltline only *Horizontal adduction active reach only *Hands behind-the-head stretch *ER @ 90 abduction stretch *Side lying IR @ 90 * Standing External Rotation </p><p>Theraband exercises:, Continue phase1 Biceps curl Row Forward punch (Serratus punch) Dynamic exercises: *Side lying ER *Prone row *Prone extension * Standing forward flexion to 90 *Prone Ts *Standing scaption *Isotonic biceps curl *Prone Ys *Rhythmic stabilization *Proprioception drills *Scapulohumeral Rhythm exercises </p><p> No push...</p></li></ul>

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