cast iron and galvanized iron pipes

Download Cast Iron and Galvanized Iron Pipes

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This presentation contains basic information about cast iron and galvanized iron pipes, with their sizes, manufacturing method and types available in market. All the information has been taken and compiled from various sources only for educational purpose

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  • 1. ContentCast Iron PipesIntroductionManufacturingUsageTypesPrice ListGalvanized Iron PipesIntroductionManufacturingUsageTypesPrice List

2. Cast Iron PipesIntroductionCast iron is iron which has been heated until it liquefies then poured into a mould tosolidify. It is usually made from pig iron.Most cast irons have a chemical composition of 2.54.0% carbon, 13% silicon, and theremainder is iron. Grey cast iron has less tensile strength and shock resistance thansteel, but its compressive strength is comparable to low and medium carbon steel.The oldest extant water pipes date from the 17th century and were installed todistribute water throughout the gardens of the Chateau de Versailles. 3. ManufacturingHorizontally CastThe first cast iron pipe was produced in horizontal moulds, the core of the mould would besupported on small iron rods which would become part of the pipe. Horizontal castingresulted in an uneven distribution of metal around the pipe circumference. Typically slagwould collect at the crown of the pipe creating a much weaker section.Vertically CastIn 1845, the first pipe was cast vertically in a pit and by the turn of the century, all pipe wasmanufactured by this method. Using this method the slag would all collect at the top of thecasting and could be removed by simply cutting off the end of the pipe. Pipes cast using thismethod often suffered from off centre bores resulting in one side of the pipe being thickerthan the opposite side, this was caused by the core of the mould being placed off centre.Centrifugally CastSubsequent to its invention by Dimitri Sensaud deLavaud, a French-Brazilian, in 1918, muchcast iron pipe manufacture shifted to the dramatically different technique of centrifugalcasting. Modern ductile iron pipe production continues to use this method of casting. 4. Manufacturing 5. ManufacturingCentrifugal Casting of Pipes 6. Usage, Advantage and DisadvantageCast iron pipe is typically used for sewer lines and municipal water but nowadays they arenot used as they have been replaced by ductile iron pipes and PVC pipes.Advantages DisadvantagesThicker wall than ductile iron or steelSimilar rate of corrosion to ductile ironand steelMost pipes after 1950 supplied withcement mortar lining or retrofittedNo elastic behaviour and lowermechanical strengthProne to external and internalcorrosion in aggressive conditionsOlder pipes having caulked joints withlittle flexibilityOften no external protectionMost pipes unlined before 1960Manufacturing defects includingvariations in wall thicknessPoor records 7. Types of FittingsFollowing are some of the fitting available in cast iron pipes 8. Types of FittingsFollowing are some of the fitting available in cast iron pipes 9. SizesCast Iron Pipes come in eight classes, A through H, rated by pressure in increments of100 feet of head. "Feet of Head" is a measure of pressure, equal to the pressuregenerated by a given height of standing water (think of a water tower). One foot of headis equal to 0.434 psi. 10. NominalPipeSizeClass A100 Foot Head(43 psi)Class B200 Foot Head(86 psi)Class C300 Foot Head(130 psi)Class D400 Foot Head(173 psi)O.D.WallThicknessI.D. O.D.WallThicknessI.D. O.D.WallThicknessI.D. O.D.WallThicknessI.D.3" 3.80" 0.39" 3.02" 3.96" 0.42" 3.12" 3.96" 0.45" 3.06" 3.96" 0.48" 3.00"4" 4.80" 0.42" 3.96" 5.00" 0.45" 4.10" 5.00" 0.48" 4.04" 5.00" 0.52" 3.96"6" 6.90" 0.44" 6.02" 7.10" 0.48" 6.14" 7.10" 0.51" 6.08" 7.10" 0.55" 6.00"8" 9.05" 0.46" 8.13" 9.05" 0.51" 8.03" 9.30" 0.56" 8.18" 9.30" 0.60" 8.10"10" 11.10" 0.50" 10.10" 11.10" 0.57" 9.96" 11.40" 0.62" 10.16" 11.40" 0.68" 10.04"12" 13.20" 0.54" 12.12" 13.20" 0.62" 11.96" 13.50" 0.68" 12.14" 13.50" 0.75" 12.00"14" 15.30" 0.57" 14.16" 15.30" 0.66" 13.98" 15.65" 0.74" 14.17" 15.65" 0.82" 14.01"16" 17.40" 0.60" 16.20" 17.40" 0.70" 16.00" 17.80" 0.80" 16.20" 17.80" 0.89" 16.02"18" 19.50" 0.64" 18.22" 19.50" 0.75" 18.00" 19.92" 0.87" 18.18" 19.92" 0.96" 18.00"20" 21.60" 0.67" 20.26" 21.60" 0.80" 20.00" 22.06" 0.92" 20.22" 22.06" 1.03" 20.00"24" 25.80" 0.76" 24.28" 25.80" 0.89" 24.02" 26.32" 1.04" 24.22" 26.32" 1.16" 24.00"30" 31.74" 0.88" 29.98" 32.00" 1.03" 29.94" 32.40" 1.20" 30.00" 32.74" 1.37" 30.00"36" 37.96" 0.99" 35.98" 38.30" 1.15" 36.00" 39.60" 1.80" 36.00" 40.04" 2.02" 36.00"42" 44.20" 1.10" 42.00" 44.50" 1.28" 41.94" 45.10" 1.54" 42.02" 45.58" 1.78" 42.02"48" 50.50" 1.26" 47.98" 50.80" 1.42" 47.96" 51.40" 1.71" 47.98" 51.98" 1.96" 48.06" 11. Galvanized Iron PipesIntroductionGalvanization is the process of applying a protective zinc coating to steel or iron, toprevent rusting. The most common method is hot-dip galvanization, in which parts aresubmerged in a bath of molten zinc. Galvanizing protects in two ways:it forms a coating of corrosion-resistant zinc which prevents corrosive substances fromreaching the more delicate metalthe zinc serves as a sacrificial anode so that even if the coating is scratched, the exposedsteel will still be protected by the remaining zinc.These pipes are widely used for conveying raw water & distribution of treatedwater in majority of rural water supply schemes, where the requirement of water is less.Mostly medium quality GI pipes are used. These pipes are cheap, light in weight and easyto handle & transport & easy to join. Their sizes vary from 15mm to 150mm. 12. Sizes 13. Thank You

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