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What you don’t know could hurt you!. Carbon Monoxide. By : Valerie York PUBH 6165 Environmental Health A general public presentation. GOAL. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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Carbon Monoxide

Carbon MonoxideWhat you dont know could hurt you!

By : Valerie YorkPUBH 6165Environmental HealthA general public presentationGood Morning. My name is Valerie York . I am currently a graduate student at Walden University enrolled in the Master of Public Health program . The subject I want to talk to you about is carbon monoxide. Even though carbon monoxide exposures (or breathing in carbon monoxide) have the potential to cause sudden illness and/or death, this life threatening hazard is not common knowledge among the general public within our communities. Not knowing the true impact associated with carbon monoxide exposures and not knowing what symptoms to look for in order to recognize an exposure, could cost someone their life. 1GOALThe goal of this presentation is to raise awareness about the life threatening dangers of carbon monoxide within the general public and to present information that can be utilized to prevent carbon monoxide illnesses and deaths.

I will be talking to you today about the dangers of carbon monoxide, specifically carbon monoxide poisoning. In a video by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention CDC-TV (2008) carbon monoxide it is referred to as the quiet killer. How many you would know why its called the quiet killer? How many of you have an idea or would be able to recognize it if you were experiencing carbon monoxide poisoning?

The goal of this presentation is to raise awareness in the general public about the serious and life-threatening dangers of carbon monoxide or (CO) for short. It is my goal to equip each of you with information that will help to safeguard you and your families from CO poisoning. Following safe, preventive measures and guidelines will reduce the risk of CO exposures which in turn will reduce the number of people adversely affected by CO. 2OBJECTIVESTo describe what carbon monoxide [CO] is and how it can harm you

Inform the public of the sources or producers of CO

Identify the signs and symptoms of CO poisoning

Describe how to prevent CO poisoning from happening to you and your familyThe purpose of this presentation is to bring awareness to the quiet killer that is carbon monoxide. By the end of this presentation, you should be able to describe what carbon monoxide is and explain how it can hurt you. You will be able to list different sources of carbon monoxide. You will learn to identify signs and symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning. You will also learn preventative actions and guidelines that will help to ensure that CO poisoning doesnt happen to you and your family.3What is Carbon Monoxide?(Benjah-bmm27, 2009)

CO is a colorless, odorless, non-irritating gas It is extremely poisonous and can cause death in a matter of minutes [1]CO can not be detected by sensory mechanismsIt can cause sudden illness or sudden death before a person is even aware of its presence [2]

1. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], 2010)2. (Prockop and Chichkova, Nov 2007)

What is carbon monoxide? Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, non-irritating gas that is produced by the incomplete combustion (or burning) of matter consisting of carbon atoms such as gasoline, wood, and charcoal. It is extremely poisonous and can cause a person to become suddenly ill or can even cause death (U.S. Department of Environmental Protection Agency [EPA], 2010) (Prockop and Chichkova, Nov 2007). CO is a quiet killer because it cannot be detected through sensory mechanisms. You cant smell it, see it, taste it, hear or feel it. A person can be breathing in CO and not know it (EPA, 2010). It isnt until the CO concentration in the blood reaches a certain level in a persons body that they begin to experience symptoms(Murphy, 2010). We will cover CO poisoning a little later in the presentation. 4Sources of CO

Some common sources of CO that we may use on a regular basis include automobiles, barbeque grills, gas heaters and furnaces (EPA,2010) & (CDC, 2009). We come in contact with sources or producers of carbon monoxide on a daily basis. As I just mentioned carbon monoxide is produced by the burning of carbon containing materials such as gasoline, wood, charcoal, etc. Some examples of sources of CO that we may see everyday are exhaust from automobiles, charcoal and propane barbeque grills, gas heaters and heating systems, and also unvented kerosene and space heaters (EPA,2010) (CDC, 2009) can be sources of CO. 5Sources of CO

Fireplaces, wood stoves, leaking chimneys, as well as gas and other fuel powered appliances such as stoves , water heaters and boilers can also produce CO (EPA,2010) & (CDC, 2009). Other sources include fireplaces, wood stoves, leaking chimneys, as well as gas and other fuel powered appliances such as stoves, water heaters and boilers can also produce CO (EPA,2010) & (CDC, 2009). Back draft from furnaces and fireplaces are also sources of CO (EPA, 2010).6Sources of CO

*A single portable generator can produce as much as 100 times more CO gas than a cars exhaust (NIST, 2009). Portable generators, lanterns and boats are also sources of CO (EPA,2010) & (CDC, 2009).

Portable generators, lanterns and boats as well as other gas powered equipment are also producers of CO. An interesting fact about portable gas-powered generators is that a single portable generator can produce as much as 100 times more CO gas than a cars exhaust (NIST, 2009). This is a reason why portable generators can be very dangerous if not used properly. Some tips for safely using portable gas-powered generators are that they should be placed as far as possible, but at least 25 ft away from your home when it is in use (CDC-TV, 2008). Researchers Wang, Emmerich and Powell (2010) of the National Institute of Standard Technology (NIST) (2010) also suggests that when operating a portable generator, you should point the generator exhaust away from the home to reduce the maximum indoor CO level. All of these sources I just listed can produce CO gas which can accumulate or collect in a closed or partially closed area or space (CDC, 2009a). 7Carbon Monoxide PoisoningResults from breathing in CO All people and animals are at risk

Most Vulnerable(CDC, 2009a)Carbon monoxide poisoning can occur when a person (and even animals ) who are occupying these areas or spaces where CO gas has collected, breaths in enough of CO gas that leads to poisoning. All people (and animals) are at risk for CO poisoning. However, infants and unborn babies and those who have respiratory problems, chronic heart disease, anemia more vulnerable to CO poisoning (CDC, 2009a).

8Carbon monoxide poisoning is the most common cause of accidental poisonings [1]

More than 50,000 Emergency room visits per year in the U.S. are attributed to CO poisonings [1]

CO poisonings result in more than 4,000 hospitalizations and more than 400 deaths per year in the U.S. [2]

1. (Weaver, 2009). 2. (CDC, 2009a).Carbon Monoxide Statistics in the U.S.CO poisonings are considered a major public health problem around the world (Murphy, 2010). Carbon monoxide is the most common cause of accidental poisonings (Weaver, 2009). Here are a few statistics relating to CO poisonings in the United States. More than 50,000 Emergency room visits per year in the U.S. are attributed to CO poisonings (Weaver, 2009). According to the CDC (2009a) CO poisonings result in more than 4,000 hospitalizations and more than 400 deaths per year.

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What happens in CO poisoning? Red blood cells pick up CO much faster than they can pick up oxygen (O2) (CDC, 2009a).If the CO concentration is high enough, oxygen may be blocked from entering the red blood cells (CDC, 2009a).The replacing of O2 cells by CO is the main reason CO poisoning occurs (The Interactive Library, 1999).Low levels of oxygen reaching the tissues in the body mainly effects the brain and the heart, two organs with high oxygen requirements (Murphy, 2010).

SYMTPOMS include : Headache, Confusion, Dizziness, Nausea, Vomiting, Chest Pain, Loss of Consciousness, DEATH! (EPA, 2010). Lets now look at how CO poisoning happens. First a person is exposed to CO by breathing it in the air. Red blood cells begin to pick up CO cells much quicker than they can pick up oxygen (O2) (CDC, 2009a). The reason for this isCO has an ability to bind to hemoglobin (the main carrier of oxygen in the blood), that is 200 times greater than that of oxygen (The Interactive Library, 1999). If the concentration of CO is high enough, oxygen may be blocked from entering red blood cells because the body may replace O2 with CO by taking up CO cells in the blood instead of O2. This damages the tissues and can cause death (CDC, 2009a). The replacing of O2 cells by CO is the main reason CO poisoning occurs (The Interactive Library, 1999). Low levels of oxygen reaching the tissues in the body mainly effects the brain and the heart, two organs with high oxygen requirements (Murphy, 2010).

Symptoms associated

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