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  • Slide 1
  • Assisting Struggling Readers and Writers: Using Evidence-Based Resources to Support Adult Learners Michigan Conference 2014 Kathy Houghton-- LINCS
  • Slide 2
  • Purpose The purpose of this resource is to introduce teachers, program directors, and professional developers to LINCS and other evidence-based resources that instructors of adult learners can use to inform their classroom practices with struggling readers and writers.
  • Slide 3
  • Agenda Session 1: Introduction to Reading Instruction Session 2: Introduction to Writing Instruction Session 3: Overview of Reading and Writing Instruction for Struggling Adults Session 4: Tour of LINCS Website and Resource Collection Session 5: Resources for Reading Instruction Session 6: Resources for Writing Instruction Session 7: Additional Web Resources Session 8: Closing
  • Slide 4
  • Learning Objectives After participating in this training, participants will be able to: Summarize major findings of recent research about the challenges that instructors face while teaching reading and writing skills to struggling adult learners Identify research-based strategies that may prove effective in helping struggling adult readers and writers in developing skills Navigate the LINCS collections to find resources that support reading and writing activities for low-literacy-skilled adults Apply reading and writing strategies to text-based materials Register for the LINCS communities of practice, create a profile, and join a community
  • Slide 5
  • SESSION 1: Introduction to Reading Instruction
  • Slide 6
  • 1.1. Evidence-Based Reading Instruction Evidence-based refers to practices that have been shown to be successful in improving reading achievement. The success of these practices is demonstrated in two ways: by research study data collected according to rigorous design, and by consensus among expert practitioners who monitor outcomes as part of their practice. For more information on what evidence-based instruction is and what it looks like, refer to the U.S. Department of Educations (2012) report, What Is Evidence-Based Reading Instruction and How Do You Know It When You See It?.What Is Evidence-Based Reading Instruction and How Do You Know It When You See It?
  • Slide 7
  • 1.2. Core Components of Reading Instruction Decoding Fluency Vocabulary Reading Comprehension
  • Slide 8
  • 1.3. General Principles of Reading Instruction Use explicit and systematic instruction to develop the major components of reading (decoding, fluency, vocabulary, comprehension) according to the assessed needs of individual learners. Combine explicit and systematic instruction with extended reading practice to promote acquisition and transfer of component reading skills. Motivate engagement with the literacy tasks used for instruction and extensive reading practice. National Research Council. (2012). Improving adult literacy instruction: Options for practice and research. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. [Box 2-2]Box 2-2
  • Slide 9
  • 1.3. General Principles of Reading Instruction (continued) Develop reading fluency as needed to facilitate efficiency in the reading of words and longer text. Explicitly teach the structure of written language to facilitate decoding and comprehension. To develop vocabulary, use a mixture of instructional approaches combined with extensive reading of texts to create an enriched verbal environment. National Research Council. (2012). Improving adult literacy instruction: Options for practice and research. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. [Box 2-2]Box 2-2
  • Slide 10
  • 1.3. General Principles of Reading Instruction To develop comprehension, teach varied goals and purposes for reading; encourage learners to state their own reading goals, predictions, questions, and reactions to material; encourage extensive reading practice with varied forms of text; teach and model the use of multiple comprehension strategies, teach self-regulation in the monitoring of strategy use. National Research Council. (2012). Improving adult literacy instruction: Options for practice and research. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. [Box 2-2]Box 2-2
  • Slide 11
  • What is evidence-based reading instruction and how do you know it when you see it? SESSION #1 ACTIVITY
  • Slide 12
  • SESSION 2: Introduction to Writing Instruction
  • Slide 13
  • 2.1. General Principles of Writing Instruction Explicitly and systematically teach the strategies, skills and knowledge of proficient writing Connect explicit instruction with extended and varied opportunities of purpose-driven writing Explicitly teach foundational skills
  • Slide 14
  • 2.1 General Principles of Writing Instruction Model writing strategies and support students self-regulation of the writing process Make explicit the reading-writing connections Create classroom environments and protocols that support learner motivation and persistence
  • Slide 15
  • 2.2. Effective Practices in Writing Instruction Strategy instruction for planning, revising, and/or editing compositions. Summarizing reading passages in writing. Peer assistance in planning, drafting, and revising compositions. Setting clear, specific goals for purposes or characteristics of the writing. Using word processing regularly. National Research Council. (2012). Improving adult literacy instruction: Options for practice and research. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. [Box 2-5]Box 2-5
  • Slide 16
  • 2.2. Effective Practices in Writing Instruction (continued) Sentence-combining instruction (instruction in combining short sentences into more complex sentences, usually including exercises and application to real writing). Process approach to writing with professional development. Inquiry approach (including clear goals, analysis of data, using specified strategies, and applying the analysis to writing). National Research Council. (2012). Improving adult literacy instruction: Options for practice and research. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. [Box 2-5]Box 2-5
  • Slide 17
  • 2.2. Effective Practices in Writing Instruction (continued) Prewriting activities (teaching students activities to generate content prior to writing). Analyzing models of good writing (discussing the features of good essays and learning to imitate those features). National Research Council. (2012). Improving adult literacy instruction: Options for practice and research. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. [Box 2-5]Box 2-5
  • Slide 18
  • How can you incorporate writing strategies into your instruction? SESSION #2 ACTIVITY
  • Slide 19
  • SESSION 3: Overview of Reading and Writing Instruction for Struggling Adults
  • Slide 20
  • 3.1. Principles of Instruction for Struggling Learners Individualize approaches to intervention by targeting specific literacy difficulties through explicit reading and writing instruction Struggling learners must have more explicit instruction with more intensity and greater opportunities to practice developing skills Struggling learners need additional support to transfer new literacy skills into contexts different from those in which they learned them
  • Slide 21
  • 3.1. Principles of Instruction for Struggling Learners (continued) Instructors need to identify, understand, and address maladaptive attributions, beliefs and motivations with targeted instruction Instruction should be differentiated to scaffold learning and meet individual needs and learning goals
  • Slide 22
  • What experiences have you had working with struggling readers and writers? SESSION #3 ACTIVITY
  • Slide 23
  • SESSION 4: Tour of LINCS Website and Resource Collection
  • Slide 24
  • 4.1. LINCS Website
  • Slide 25
  • 4.2. LINCS Communities of Practice
  • Slide 26
  • SESSION 5: Resources for Reading Instruction
  • Slide 27
  • 5.1. Types of Resources Available Research on adult reading instruction Research-based products Professional Development Opportunities
  • Slide 28
  • 5.2. Research on Adult Reading Instruction
  • Slide 29
  • 5.2.a. Synthesis of Research on Adult Reading Instruction In 2012, the National Research Council released Improving Adult Literacy Instruction: Options for Practice and Research. This 500- page document synthesizes the research on literacy and learning instruction in the United States, focusing on individuals ages 16 and older who are not in the K-12 education system. The full report can be accessed here.here
  • Slide 30
  • Take a look at the research to get an idea of what is available SESSION #5 ACTIVITY
  • Slide 31
  • 5.2.b. Practitioner-Friendly Research In addition to the full report, the NRC has released two practitioner-friendly booklets that summarize the results of the report and provide information that is relevant to curriculum developers, literacy program administrators, teachers, and tutors. Both booklets can be accessed here.here
  • Slide 32
  • 5.3. Products for Practitioners The LINCS network offers a number of texts and websites for instructors. Two will be described in the following sli

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