aliim smartphone schools contextualizing mobile learning for syrian refugee girls janae bushman

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  • SMARTPHONE SCHOOLS:Contextualizing Mobile Learning

    for Syrian Refugee GirlsAliim.org

  • of Syrian refugees in Jordan and Lebanon between the ages of15-18 years attend formal secondary school

    61 Million Children Around the World are Out-of-School

    Education Cannot Wait

    50%

    30%of Refugee Girls areEnrolled inSecondary School

    of the out-of-school

    children worldwide live

    in areas of conflict

    secondary school enrollment is 1/3 lower inconflict-affected countries compared with other

    developing countries

    5%

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    Aliim.org

  • If Students Can't Come to School,We Must Take School to Them

    Reach Girls

    Educate Youth

    Despite Conflict

    Aliim.org

  • Framework Purpose

    Connect education and mobile learning theory toconflict-affected context

    Needs Impacts Tools

    DesignforContext

    Three Steps

    Aliim.org

  • STEP 1: NEEDS

  • Research by the Women's Refugee Commission finds that education interventionsfor adolescent girls affected by conflict should include:

    Needs of Girls Affected by Conflict

    Informal Learning OpportunitiesProvide informal learningopportunities for out-of-schooladolescent girls

    Flexible StructureConsider daily routines, care takingresponsibilities and time issue

    Address BarriersAddress barriers that keepadolescent girls from participatingin schooling

    Include the VulnerableBe aware of the needs ofvulnerable girls, including girlsunaccompanied, out-of-school,married, young mothers, anddisabled

    1

    Aliim.org

  • Hundreds of Thousands Not in School

    70,000 refugee children in Jordanremain outside any type of

    schooling.

    29% of girls in Jordan &Lebanon leave home only

    once or less during theweek, preventing manyfrom attending school.

    300kOut-of-School

    No morethan 3years

    29%of girls

    70KOut-of-School

    Nearly 4 years after the beginning of the Syrian conflict we still need a way to scale up accessto quality education for refugees:

    In Jordan, if youth are out ofschool more than 3 yearsthey are ineligible to enrollin formal school again.

    1

    300,000 Syrian refugees inLebanon were out-of-school during the 2013-2014 school year.2

    34

    Aliim.org

  • Barriers toEducation

    Examples Negative Impacts Smartphone Schools:Mobile Learning Solutions

    Lack of EducationalInfrastructure

    No space in schools; insufficienttransportation; limited number oftrained teachers; Lack of certifiededucation programs.

    Decreases access to education:Many Syrian refugee students areexcluded from education includingthe most vulnerable.

    Develop a non-formaleducational infrastructure bycreating both local and virtualcollaborative environments,utilizing technology, mentors,and certification options.

    High Cost of SchoolAttendance

    Fees; transportation; clothing;supplies; wash facilities; missedincome for families; parents needhelp at home.

    Decreased Enrollment Rates: Thesefactors discourage parents fromenrolling students in school.

    Eliminate the need fortransportation, fees, schoolclothes and supplies. Make theprogram flexible for students toparticipate in their free time.

    Safety Concerns Parents feel school is unsafe for girls;harassment and discrimination inschools; tensions with host-community; deteriorating security.

    Low Attendance Rates and Levels ofMeaningful Learning: These factorsdisrupt learning in school anddiscourage students fromconsistently attending.

    Allow students and parents thefreedom to choose locationsthey feel are safe learningenvironments.

    Lack of Support toAddress RefugeesSpecial Needs

    Students struggle with adapting tonew curriculum; students can'tunderstand language of instruction(English and French); studentsstruggle coping with trauma anddistress; students fall behind peersfrom the host-country.

    Low Levels of Meaningful Learning:These factors inhibit students fromsucceeding in school, which leads toincreased drop-out-rates, greaterfrustration, and loss of hope andmotivation.

    Reach vulnerable students.Provide psychosocial support,language learningopportunities, catch-up classes,local supervisors, virtualmentors and community andparent support.

    Barriers to Accessing Quality Education Amongst Syrian School-AgedRefugees in Lebanon and Jordan According to UNHCRs 3RP for 2015-2016

    1,2

    2,3

    4

    5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12

    Aliim.org

  • Smartphone SchoolsPreliminary Needs Assessment in Sida, Lebanon

    Surveyed parents and youth, both attending / not-attending school

    Survey in SyrianSchool

    Small Focus Groups ina Shelter

    Aliim.org

  • What we learned from our Survey Results

    13 out of 19 parents said they didnot currently live close to a school.

    Key Barriers to Formal Schooling

    While school costs about $50USD/month, most parents can only pay

    $25 USD/month for 1 child to go toschool.

    CAN'T AFFORD COST

    SCHOOL IS TOO FAR

    Openness to Non-Formal Education

    Students indicated they want to learnEnglish, Business, and Finance to help

    them get good jobs.

    NEEDED SKILLS

    Half of the students said theycontribute to their family income.

    WORK TO EARN MONEY

    SAFE LOCATIONS

    PARENTS COMMITTED

    MENTORS HELP

    Total Respondent Number: 19 students and 19 parentsAverage age of respondent/adolescent: 13-14 years old

    Location: Sidon, Lebanon

    CERTIFICATION

    Feel mosques, and their home aresafest places for learning outside offormal school, but also open to community center.

    Though formal schooling is preferred,the majority of parents said they atleast want their kids to go to school,even if it is not accredited.

    If given tools, most parents wouldspend at least 1 hour/day to help theirchild learn at home.

    84% of students feel it's extremelyimportant to have a mentors help,10% said it was important, and 6%not important.

    Aliim.org

  • Survey Results: Student Use of Technology and Internet

    74% of students knowhow to use a computer

    68% have at least onesmart phone in theirfamily

    53% say they use theinternet once or more

    per day

    16% use it at least onceper week

    Aliim.org

  • STEP 2: IMPACT

  • Mobile Learning Impacts

    Work Backwards: What socialimpact do you want your mobilelearning program to have onparticipants and their communities?

    Tip 1

    Learning Objectives

    Tip 2Fit for Purpose: Clarify objectivesto be achieved throughtechnology and through socialcomponents1

    2

    Cognitive - What do I want my graduates to know? Affective - What do you want your graduates to think or care about Behavioral - What do you want your graduates to be able to do?

    Aliim.org

  • Smartphone Schools Program Impact

    Amongst Out-of-School Syrian Refugeesand Marginalized Youth

    Ages 12-16 in Lebanon and Jordan

    By Delivering Non-Formal Educational Toolsthat Empower Students to:

    be resilient in their current situation

    Increase Access to Quality and Relevant Education

    contribute positively to their new communities

    actively build a good future for themselves

    Aliim.org

  • Learning Objectives

    Cognitive

    Affective

    Behavioral

    English Certification - Students will be prepared to successfully take and pass the TOEFLiBT/Junior TOEFL

    Social Cohesion - Students will feel a sense of belonging to both virtual andphysical learning communities by interacting, teaching, and serving those intheir communities.

    Peace Building - Students will feel a sense of purpose,think for themselves, practice tolerance, value humanrights, and deal with the traumas of war productively

    Literacy and Numeracy Skills - Students will learn

    7th and 8th grade literacy and numeracy skills in boththeir mother language (Arabic) and in English

    Life Skills - Student will learn about how to dealwith new environments and different cultures,personal finance basics, goal setting, basicentrepreneurial computer skills

    Aliim.org

  • Empowerment Projects: Solidify Learning by Doing

    At the End of Each Curriculum Unit, Students Must Complete a Project Using Critical Thinking Skills

    1, 9

    Individual to CommunityCollaboration

    Contextual Application:Learner Driven / Meta Learning

    Perceptive Writing:Active Learning

    Research-BasedInquiry and Reasoning:Collaborative Learning

    23

    4

    Virtual Journals Community ProjectGroup Presentation

    Problem Solve Individually

    Sets Own Goals

    Strategize Approach withmentor

    Self-Evaluate Progress

    Problem Solve as a Group

    Formulate Questions andIdentify Resources

    Opportunities to Lead

    Solidify Learning by TeachingOthers

    Apply Lessons to Surroundings

    Utilize various modes ofcommunication

    Self-Reflection: Relationship toNew Environment

    Feedback from Mentor and Peers

    5

    11

    10

    6

    7

    8

    Aliim.org

  • STEP 3: TOOLS

  • Enabling Technology to Achieve Learning Objectives

    Asynchronous and Synchronous Technology

    Use Effective Learning Principles(Watkins, Carnell, and Lodge, 2007)

    1. Produce work based on feedback (Active learning)

    2. Collaborate with others (Collaborative learning)

    3. Make choices about their learning (Learner-driven)

    4. Monitor and review how they learn (Meta-learning)

    Aliim.org

  • Student Motivation and Incentives

    Leverage GamingPrinciples and

    Social Networks

    AB Test UserInterface for