agile transformation white paper

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  • Agile TRANSFORMATION

    How are we tracking?

  • Agile Transformation

    INTRODUCTION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    OUR PANELLISTS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    WHAT DOES AGILE TRANSFORMATION MEAN TO YOU?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    WHAT DOES GOOD SPONSORSHIP FOR AGILE TRANSFORMATION LOOK LIKE?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    WHAT CAN WE LEARN FROM WHAT LEADING EDGE COMPANIES ARE DOING?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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    HOW CAN WE GET THE MOST OUT OF THE EXPERIENCE OF WORKING WITH AGILE COACHES?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    WHAT ARE THE KEY CHARACTERISTICS OF GOOD AGILE TALENT?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    WHAT IS THE BEST WAY TO GET ACCEPTANCE FOR AN AGILE APPROACH IN A TRADITIONALCORPORATE SETTING? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

    CONTENTS

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  • Agile Transformation 01

    01

    Agile transformation is at the very top of every business agenda in Australia right now.

    Organisations have recognised that in a rapidly changing, digitally-driven climate,

    standing still is not an option. Success indeed survival depends on them becoming

    more innovative in the way they react to evolving customer and shareholder needs

    and more agile in their response to constant disruptions in the markets they serve.

    The current impetus has been partly driven by the Government, which has made

    working towards a more agile Australia one of the bedrocks of its economic

    strategy. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, recently urged companies to recognise

    that disruption and change is our friend, if we are agile and smart enough to take

    advantage of it.

    This pressing need to become more fleet of foot is also graphically illustrated by the

    statistics on company survival rates. The average lifespan of a company listed on the

    US S&P 500 index is now just 15 years. It is estimated that by 2020, more than three

    quarters of those featured in the index will be companies we have not yet heard of.

    Organisations are working hard to rise to the challenge of an agile Australia.

    Expenditure on transformation initiatives has increased and there has been an

    explosion of interest in the processes and techniques that can support companies

    in their attempts to scale up and make rapid change. Forward-looking businesses

    are also looking to take lessons from the start-up sector, where agility is typically

    ingrained in the culture and curiosity and experimentation are hallmarks of the way

    people work.

    Alongside this growing interest, we have seen significant growth in the agile

    community, with specialist roles in this field increasing over the past two years.

    INTRODUCTION

  • Agile Transformation 02

    02

    The transition to agile however, is not always easy, and organisations who embark on

    this journey are faced with numerous challenges along the way. For many, becoming

    a truly agile organisation is nothing short of a major cultural change, requiring buy-

    in from the very top of the organisation as well as significant shifts in mindset and

    approaches at all management levels.

    Morgan McKinley has been hosting a regular breakfast briefing series and for its

    most recent, we brought together a panel of Australias leading experts in agile

    transformation. In an engaging and interactive session attended by more than 180

    delegates, they discussed what progress has been made in the past two years and

    what still needs to be done, sharing their personal experiences and advice as both

    individuals and business leaders.

    Their answers to some of the most pressing questions in the agile transformation

    space are outlined throughout this white paper.

  • Agile Transformation 03

    03OUR PANELLISTS

    JODY WEIR Head of Agility at AMP

    Jody joined AMP in 2015 as the Head of Agility and has more than 20 years of experience in the financial services industry in both Australia and the USA. With a passion for Agile, innovation and new ways of working, Jody has enjoyed senior leadership roles across both business and IT.

    ROB MARCOLINA Group Executive - Strategy, Transformation and IT at Qantas

    Rob Marcolina joined Qantas in October 2012 as Executive Manager Strategy and has expanded his role over the past few years to now having responsibility for driving the overall strategy of the Qantas Group, leading the group wide transformation program and day-to-day responsibility for Qantas IT systems.

    TZIPI AVIOZIT Director, Customer Solutions and New Zealand at AMP

    Tzipi Avioz joined AMP in April 2016. She is a highly experienced with over 20 years of experience in technology and business leadership. She is experienced in delivering large transformation programs using both traditional and agile delivery methodologies and is passionate in the area of digital commerce, Data & Analytics and Customer Interactions.

    DENNISE OPENSHAWDigital Delivery and Agile Transformation Executive Consultant - Independent

    Dennise is a senior technology leader with over 35 years of experience in the IT industry. She has spent the last 10 years leading Agile engineering teams, Agile professional services teams, and organizational change programs in Australia and internationally.

    SARAH ATKINSONFounder/Principal Consultant - Digital Transformation, Enterprise Agile at Pragmateam

    Sarah co-founded Agile Delivery Consultancy, Pragmateam. Now two years on, she and her colleagues at Pragmateam work with a diverse range of clients enabling transformation through delivery. Her hands on experience and passion are backed by over 15 years of successfully building and leadership of teams through toworking with senior executives.

    TONY NGUYENEnterprise Agile and Innovation Lead at CBA

    Tony currently heads up the Agile practice across CBAs Retail portfolio. Tonys agile journey began at a software start-up called Altiris where he helped grow the team from 10 in Sydney to 600 worldwide at the time of acquisition by Symantec in 2007. He spent 6 years working and traveling in the US with Symantec, running program management and engineering divisions across a myriad of locations.

  • Agile Transformation 04

    Agile transformation has its roots in software development but panellists agreed

    that it has now evolved to be about much more than IT.

    For several of the organisations represented, it is a much broader concept, which

    involves empowering employees to try new approaches, encouraging collaboration

    between cross-functional teams and building a culture of continuous learning and

    improvement. One organisation that has been on an agile journey for several years

    has now embedded the approach into the business, making it the responsibility of

    every manager to think and act differently.

    Panellists warned of the danger of adopting agile processes to tackle specific issues

    without looking at the wider picture. To make any kind of transformation sustainable,

    organisations need to take a joined-up approach, bringing an agile perspective to

    every aspect of the way they work, from leadership style and structure through to

    governance and funding models.

    04WHAT DOES AGILE TRANSFORMATIONMEAN TO YOU?

  • Agile Transformation

    Support from the top is vital if agile transformation projects are to have any chance

    of success. The starting point for many organisations has been to provide training for

    senior teams, to ensure they fully understand the concept of agile and the value it can

    bring. Once the senior team are engaged with the process, training can be cascaded

    throughout the business, to ensure the approach is embraced by all rather than just

    existing in isolated pockets.

    Getting leaders immersed in projects either through study tours or invitations to

    take part in team huddles is another initiative that has proved successful. If leaders

    fully appreciate the challenges agilists are facing and understand the barriers they

    are up against, they will be better equipped to remove road blocks and accelerate

    progress.

    Panellists also highlighted the importance of creating an environment of transparency

    and open communication. This can help to avoid the situation of the frozen middle,

    where there is a groundswell of action at team level and enthusiastic support at the

    top, but a risk that projects will stall in the middle because managers at this level have

    not been informed or involved. Sponsors have a pro-active role to play in creating

    a safe environment where managers can walk towards the tension that is stopping

    them embracing agile working.

    05

    05WHAT DOES GOOD SPONSORSHIP FOR AGILE TRANSFORMATION LOOK LIKE?

    There was consensus that perhaps the most important quality of a sponsor was a

    willingness to hold the line when projects didnt go according to plan. When things

    go poorly or projects are delayed, its really easy to revert to old behaviours, but we

    need s