agenda: turn in persuasive essay (if needed) debrief persuasive essay in meta-cog log introduce...

Download Agenda: Turn in Persuasive Essay (if needed) Debrief Persuasive Essay in Meta-Cog Log Introduce Expository Essay and Strategies Read and Assess Example

Post on 01-Jan-2016

213 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Agenda: Turn in Persuasive Essay (if needed)Debrief Persuasive Essay in Meta-Cog LogIntroduce Expository Essay and StrategiesRead and Assess Example Essays

    Homework:None!10th Grade EnglishMonday10 Mar. 2014

  • HSPE Persuasive EssayFirst things first! Please write:In the left-hand margin write todays date: 10 Mar. 2014 In the normal writing area, write Individual Feedback on HSPE Persuasive Essay, then what youre doing well and what you could improve on (written directly on your piece of paper)Below that, write HSPE Persuasive Debrief, then write the whole-class feedback of what most of us are doing well and what most of us could improve on (presented on the powerpoint)

  • HSPE Persuasive DebriefCommonly misspelled words: license, receive and high school (two words, not one).Double check spelling/grammar of words in prompt: license, editor, B averageSynonyms for clearly are: obviously, undoubtedly, unmistakably, and noticeablyCommon usage errors to be mindful of: your vs. youre, there/their/theyre, and to vs. too.Comma placement at opening of letter: Dear John, NOT Dear, JohnSign end of letter: Best regards, your nameIf . . . , then . . . comma placement: with an if . . . then . . . statement, place a comma at the end of the if . . . statement and before the then statement starts.For example: If students cannot drive, then they will miss after-school activities.For example: If voters pass this law, students will try harder.

  • HSPE High School Proficiency Exams2014

  • Checklist for Expository WritingMy essay or letter will explain successfully if I select specific, relevant content and organize my writing well. That means I should:follow the directions given in the writing prompt;narrow my topic; stay focused on the main ideas;elaborate by: explaining cause and effect explain the process or procedure for something explain brief and specific time-frames for well-chosen anecdotes explain specific details and/or examples to support ideas;include information that is interesting, thoughtful, and necessary for my audience to know;organize my writing with an introduction, supporting paragraphs with main points and elaboration, and an effective conclusion;use transitions to connect my ideas.

  • Checklist for Expository Writing continued

    My essay or letter will explain successfully if I demonstrate an effective style. That means I should:show that I care about my topic by writing in a voice appropriate for my audience and purpose;use language that is appropriate for my audience and purpose;use specific words and phrases that help the reader understand my ideas; anduse sentences of varied length and structure.

  • Checklist for Expository Writing, continued

    My essay or letter will explain successfully if I follow conventions in writing. That means I should:follow the rules of Standard English usage; spell words correctly;use correct capitalization;use correct punctuation;write complete sentences; andindicate where new paragraphs begin.

  • FPAT FORM PURPOSE AUDIENCE TOPIC

  • Sample Expository PromptWhat object is most important to you? In an essay, explain to your teacher why it is your most important object.Form? - essayPurpose? expository (or explain!)Audience? - teacherTopic? - favorite object

  • 2013 Expository PromptSubstitute TeacherOne of your teachers will soon have a substitute teacher fill in for the rest of the year. Write a multiple-paragraph essay for the substitute explaining what he or she will need to know to be successful.F?P?A?T?

  • 2012 Expository PromptFavorite Time of YearMost of us have a favorite time of year. What is your favorite time of the year? Write a multiple-paragraph essay for your teacher explaining what time of the year is your favorite and why.F?P?A?T?

  • 2011 Expository PromptA Favorite PlaceThink about a favorite place. Write a multi-paragraph essay for your teacher in which you identify a place and explain why it is your favorite place.F?P?A?T?

  • 2010 Expository PromptAn Experience with Money All of us have had experiences with money. It might be an experience in which you earned, lost, saved, or needed money. Choose an experience you have had with money that you will remember for some time. Write a multiple-paragraph essay for your teacher in which you explain what happened and why that experience was important to you. F?P?A?T?

  • Model Expository Essays Scoring 1-4Directions: Please read the example essays that scored 1-4. While you read, keep T-Chart Notes of 3 specific elements: Elementary vs. Advanced TransitionsTopic SentencesTypes of Elaboration and length of elaboration

    All done? Please note the following:What are some differences between the level 2 essay (not passing), and the level 3 essay (passing)?What does the level 4 essay do that the level 3 does not? (In other words, what are some differences between them?)What do you notice about the level 2 essay? Why do you think it earned a 2?

  • Narrow the topic.Today, we are going to make sure that your topic isnt too broad.Well start with a very broad topicGlobal IssuesHow can you tell that Global Issues is too broad?

  • Narrow the topic - step 2List different Global Issues (e.g., poverty, pollution, human rights violations).Select one of those issues (e.g., pollution).List subtopics for the selected issue (e.g., air, water, noise, soil).Select one of those subtopics (e.g., air).List subtopics for that issue (e.g., emissions, fossil fuels, SUVs).Have you found a topic you can develop specifically?If not, continue the process.

  • Narrow the topic -- step 3Now practice again, with a different topic.Well start with a broad topicSports or activitiesHow can you tell that Sports or Activities is too big?

  • Narrow the topic -- step 4.List different sports or activities.Select one of those sports or activities. List subtopics for the selected sport or activity.Select one of those subtopics.List subtopics for that issue. Have you found a topic you can develop specifically?If not, continue the process.

  • Practice with a PromptNarrow a topic from the following prompt.PROMPT: Your teacher has learned that a 10th grade student from another state is moving to your area. Write a multiple-paragraph letter to the new student explaining what it is like to live in your community.

    Remember to Select and narrow a topic. Plan the organization of your paper. Organizational Strategies for Body Paragraphs: explaining cause and effect explain the process or procedure for something explain brief and specific time-frames for well-chosen anecdotes explain specific details and/or examples to support ideas;

  • Read for ConventionsBasic spelling (including homonyms)Capitalization PunctuationPeriods (run-togethers), apostrophes (possessives), commas, question marks especially in rhetorical questionsSubject-verb agreement, particularly number agreement with their (pronoun referents and verb agreement)Complete sentences Paragraphing

  • Reflection - Goal FormThink about the writing you have done over the past two weeks.Look at the HSPE Scoring Guides and Expository Checklist. Think about what you want to be able to do with your writing. Think about narrowing a topic. Do you want toBuild on something you do well? Turn a weakness into a strength? Pick some conventions, too.Write these goals at the top of your expository essay so you keep them in mind while youre writing.

    *This slide is here to remind you that students need to use the WASL checklist for expository writing that they should have in their folders. It is important to review this checklist with the students. The checklist is on three slides.*This slide is here to remind you that students need to use the WASL checklist for expository writing that they should have in their folders. It is important to review this checklist with the students.

    *This slide is here to remind you that students need to use the WASL checklist for expository writing that they should have in their folders. It is important to review this checklist with the students.

    *Narrowing (50 minutes) has 4 slides

    What this lesson does is walk students through the process of troubleshooting a topic, making sure that they havent selected a topic thats too large.*Generate a class list of all ideas related to global issues.Have students choose one of those ideas and create a second list of everything they can think of about that topic.Then have students narrow to a third list of specific details.

    A good analogy to use with students is the notion of a periscope. Have students roll up a sheet of paper into a tube. Have them look through it. Ask how much they can see. Tell them narrowing a topic is like a periscope. You focus in on a small piece of the topic.*Now try it again with a topic that seems manageable. Sports or Activities appear to be a narrow topic to most students, but there are entire books dedicated to that topic.

    *Have students narrow this topic in the way that they narrowed global Issues. If students have a difficult time narrowing this topic, ask the following questions:What is your favorite sport or activity? Sport or Activity history, training, availability, spectator or participant, competition?Look at one of those categories (e.g., baseball). Entire books are written about baseball.Narrowing again, what about Mariners? Are you going to write about their history? The players? Future?Still a big topic.Have students narrow until they have a reasonable topic. (e.g., Ichiro is the most valuable player on the Mariners.)

    *Several paragraphs on narrowed topic (20 minutes)

    This should be about a page or two. This paper can be written in their notebooks.Be sure the paper is dated.Optional -- Stu