[Advances in Chemistry] Aquatic Humic Substances Volume 219 (Influence on Fate and Treatment of Pollutants) || Subject Index

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  • 838 AQUATIC HUMIC SUBSTANCES Vik, Eilen Arctander, 385 Weber, Walter J., Jr., 501 Webster, G. R. Barrie, 251 Wijayaratne, R. D, 209 Wilson, Lawrence C., 783 Wolfe, N. L., 323

    Wong, Sau-Pong, 549 Yohe, Thomas L., 533 Zalewski, Margaret S., 173 Zepp, Richard G., 363 Zika, Rod G , 333 Zimmer, Gerhard, 579

    Affiliation Index

    Academy of Natural Science, 159 Camp Dresser and McKee, 797 Centre de Recherche Lyonnaise des Eaux,

    93 Centre de Recherche Lyonnaise des Eaux-

    Degrmont, 749 Centre National de la Recherche

    Scientifique et GS Traitement Chemique des Eaux, 425

    Chesapeake Biological Laboratory, 209 Chisholm Institute of Technology, 65 City University of New York Medical

    School, 173 Colorado School of Mines, 41, 55,107, 321 Drexel University, 117,159, 533 Enseco, 295 Florida International University, 331 Freshwater Institute, 251 Georgia Institute of Technology, 279, 473 Hokkaido Research Institute for

    Environmental Pollution, 453 Hokkaido University, 453 Illinois State Water Survey, 639 Kiwa Ltd., 663 Laboratoire de Recherche de la Lyonnaise

    des Eaux, 425 Louisiana State University, 209 New York State Department of

    Environmental Conservation, 223 Norwegian Hydrotechnical Laboratory, 385

    Norwegian Institute of Technology, 697, 769,813

    Norwegian Water Technology Centre, 385 Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 263 Pennsylvania State University, 409 Philadelphia Suburban Water Company,

    533 State University of New YorkSyracuse,

    173,223 Swiss Federal Institute of Water Resources

    and Water Pollution Control, 361 University of Arizona, 443 University of Houston, 797 University of Karlsruhe, 579,623 University of Manitoba, 251 University of Miami, 331 University of Michigan, 231, 501 University of Minnesota, 185 University of Missouri, 83 University of North Carolina, 3, 727 University of Rhode Island, 295 University of Southern California, 549 University of Utah, 65 U.S. Army Construction Engineering

    Research Laboratory, 639 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-

    Athens, GA, 321 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-

    Cincinnati, OH, 597, 681 U.S. Geological Survey, 25, 55, 107,131

    Subject Index

    A

    Abiotic hydrolysis effects of sorption, 328 hydrolytic half-lives, 324 influences of natural organic matter,

    323-332

    Acid-catalyzed hydrolyses, presence of natural organic matter, 330-331

    Acid-extractable organic compounds, clarification and filtration, 795

    Acid digestion, humin, 42 Acid methylene chloride extracted water

    samples, gas chromatograms, 788/

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    In Aquatic Humic Substances; Suffet, I., et al.; Advances in Chemistry; American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 1988.

  • INDEX 839

    Acidic functional groups analysis of stream sediment humin, 49 chlorine oxidation reactions, 488-489 humic substances, 483 net titration curves, 485

    Acidic phenols, source differentiator, 13 Acidification, waste steel pickling liquor,

    86 Activated carbon, interaction with DOM,

    549 Activated-carbon adsorption

    aquatic humic substances, 697-726 capacity, 592 halogenated organic compounds, 588 humic substances and 1-131, 634/ humic substances and methyl iodide, 635/ refractory organic compounds, 90 removal effectiveness, 631/, 632/, 632*

    Activated-carbon filters, chlorinated hydrocarbons, 579

    Adduct formation, amine functional group, 219

    Adsorbability coagulation, 736 IAST model, 734

    Adsorbable organic halogen formation, 676-677 in chlorinated effluents, 677/

    Adsorbate molecules, localized sites on the adsorbent surface, 240

    Adsorbent-concentration effect, 234 Adsorbent-dosage effect, applicability of

    model, 559-560 Adsorber modeling and design, general

    approach, 550 Adsorption

    and interparticle bridging, 395 carbon pore size, 701 destabilization, 396, 401 factors influencing uptake, 439-441

    Adsorption analysis drinking-water-treatment design, 595 humic substances, 581-585 treatment control, 585-586

    Adsorption behavior comparison, 584 effect of pH, 585 for a mixture, 582 influence of ozone, 585

    Adsorption by activated carbon, 1-131 and DOC maximum removal effectiveness, 631

    Adsorption capacity adsorber system design, 701-702 background DOM, 510 before and after ozonation, 702 Freundlich equation, 816

    Adsorption chromatography, 108 Adsorption competition

    enrichment of humic substances, 589 micropollutant adsorption capacity,

    588-589

    Adsorption constants, modified difference method, 237

    Adsorption data, humic acid and kaolinite, 239-242

    Adsorption-desorption hysteresis, 234 Adsorption effect, definition, 134 Adsorption equilibria, hysteresis effects, 513 Adsorption function, calculations, 421 Adsorption isotherms

    bottle point technique, 728-732 chloroform, 565/, 572/, 573/ DHA in the presence and absence of

    calcium ion, 570/ geosmin in DHA background solution,

    566/ Lake Constance humic acid at different

    pH values, 586/ nonpolar organic compounds, 118 PCB congener in OFW and DFA

    background solutions, 567/ TCE in DHA background solution, 564/

    Adsorption models, organic micropollutants in the presence of DHS, 550

    Adsorption of organic compounds effect of calcium ions, 568 on DHA-presorbed carbon, 568

    Adsorption or desorption fronts, curves of first derivatives, 539

    Adsorption partition coefficients, multicomponent model predictions, 245*

    Adsorption-rate parameters, behavior of target compounds, 502

    Adsorption reaction, function of molecular weight and adsorbing groups, 422

    Adsorption reversibility, 516 Adsorption site depletion

    competition, 537 finite mass transfer, 537 isothermal, 536 variable influent, 538

    Aerobic biological processes, end products, 455

    Affinity of DOM for HOC, variability, 272 Affinity of solutes for stationary phase,

    breakthrough position, 540 Aggregation

    humic substances, 66, 78 particles, 394

    Aging effects of DOM, photoreactants, 379 Agricultural wastewater reclamation, 783 Air stripping, chlorinated hydrocarbons,

    579 Al , 3

    content in precipitated floes, 432* ionic coordination, 428 polyaluminum chloride solutions, 431 relative content in particles, 428-431 structure of aggregates, 432

    Algal cultures H2O2 decay experiments, 353 H 2 0 2 formation, 353

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    In Aquatic Humic Substances; Suffet, I., et al.; Advances in Chemistry; American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 1988.

  • 840 AQUATIC HUMIC SUBSTANCES

    Aliphatic carbon, composition, 6 Aliphatic material, 12 Alkali metal reduction

    humic acid structural characterization, 15 humic substances, 8-15 mechanism, 15 reaction apparatus, 15-16

    Alkaline salt solution, rgnrant, 830 n-Alkanes, stream sediment bitumen, 49-50,

    50/ Alkylphenols, relative reactivity sequence,

    375 Al(OH)3, precipitation, 414-419 Alum

    and PACS, NMR spectra, 427/, 428/ polymers of hydrolyzed aluminum, 410

    Alum coagulation 302 removal areas, 494/ 502 removal areas, 495/ design and operation diagram, 398/ effects of pH and stoichiometry, 492 effects of turbidity, 492 humic substances, 490-495 reduction of THMs, 489 removal characteristics, 491,491/, 492/

    Alum floes, specific surface area, 433-435 Alumina, adsorption of natural organic

    matter, 242 Aluminum

    concentration in colloids, 431* galvanic corrosion, 403 in finished water, 403 reactions with fulvic acid, 409-424 removal by filtration, 417 residua] concentration, 404/ sediment buildup, 403 speciation, 409 stable polymers, 410-412

    Aluminum chemistry, 392, 425-442 Aluminum coagulants, speciation, 412 Aluminum coagulation, organic-compound

    removal, 454-463 Aluminum compounds, reaction rates, 393 Aluminum fulvate system, precipitation,

    449 Aluminum-humic-substance complexes or

    aggregates, 465-467 Aluminum hydroxide

    ionic coordination, 428 mobility, 445 structure, 429/ symmetry of NMR spectra, 429/ turbidity of suspensions, 428

    Aluminum-particle interactions, 451 Aluminum polymers, 392, 467 Aluminum salts in water treatment, 431 Ames test, 676 Amine residue, covalent binding

    mechanisms, 210 Ammonolysis-reduction

    extent, 18

    Ammonolysis-reductionContinued highly oxidized compounds, 19 products, 19*, 20* type of bond, 19

    AMW distribution, treatment processes, 486 Anion-exchange resins

    acrylate skeleton, 801 aquatic organic substances, 797-811 gelular, 801 macroporous, 801 polystyrene skeleton, 801 properties, 802* removal of an organic acid, 799/

    Anionic chelates, 87 Anionic humate molecules, electrostatic

    adsorption, 440 Anionic surfactants

    percent recoveries of HS, 109* separation from ground water, 107-114

    Anoxic sediments geochemical changes, 298 interstitial chromium, 303-304

    Anthropogenic organic chemicals, aqueous hydrolytic reactions, 323-332

    Aquatic humic materials alcohol fragments, 4 chlorination, 6 comparison, 98-100 mechanistic interactions with anion-

    exchange resins, 797-811 method-specific structural relationships, 7 oxidation and hydrolysis, 4 precursors for production of

    photoreactants, 363 quantum efficiencies, 369 removal by ozonation and activated-

    carbon adsorption, 697-726 singlet oxygen production, 369 sources and sinks, 363-381 structural relationships, 7/ two-column isolation scheme, 111-112

    Aquatic radioactive iodine, fate and removal, 623-636

    Aqueous solubility, 552 Aromatic amines

    chromatographic conditions for separation, 212*

    importance, 209 industrial discharge, 210 reaction with clay minerals, 219 sorption parameters on estuarine colloids,

    214* structures, 214/ toxicity, mutagenicity, and

    carcinogenicity, 210 Aromatic compounds

    bonds, 5 saturation, 12

    Aromatic rings, o-toluidine sorption characteristics, 220

    Artifact studies, 303-304

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    In Aquatic Humic Substances; Suffet, I., et al.; Advances in Chemistry; American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 1988.

  • INDEX 841 Ash content

    decrease by liquid-liquid extraction, 59-60

    humic substances, 59 influence on elemental analysis, 60

    Assimilable organic carbon AOCr/DOC ratio, 668 formation, function of ozone dosage,

    668-669 variations from raw to finished water,

    670/ Association of HOCs with DOM,

    environmental significance, 271 Atrazine

    hydrolysis, 326/ pH dependence of hydrolysis rate, 326 pH-rate profile for hydrolysis, 327/

    Automation beds-in-series system, 823 water-treatment system, 830

    Aziridine derivatives hydrolysis rate constants, 331 structure, 331/

    Azobenzene effects of changes in pH on Koc values,

    221 equilibrium sorption isotherm, 217/ sorption on colloidal organic matter,

    209-222 structure, 214/

    Background DOM adsorption capacity, 509-515 commercial humic acid, 510

    Background solutions, 560 Bacterial regrowth

    coagulation and filtration processes, 679 during distribution, 664 filtrate disinfection, 679 ozonated water without further

    posttreatment, 671 Base-catalyzed hydrolytic reactions,

    retarded by natural organic matter, 330 Base-extracted humic materials, 124 Bayerite, 428 Benzidine

    effects of changes in pH on values, 218/

    enhanced sorption, 217-218 equilibrium sorption isotherm, 215/ sorption on colloidal organic matter,

    209-222 structure, 214/

    Benzyl chloride, molecular structure, 329/ Bernay deposit, analysis, 760* Binding coefficients, HOC and humic

    acids, 242-244 Binding-site concentration, 287

    Bioaccumulation of HOCs in aquatic systems, effect of humic substances, 271

    Bioavailability binding of contaminants to humic

    substances, 263 contaminants bound to DOM, 267

    Bioconcentration, contaminants bound to DOM, 270

    Bioconcentration factor, 272 Biodegradable compounds

    concentration, 668 formation, 671* organic, 455 removal processes, 671

    Biodgradation adsorptive properties, 702 effect on activated-carbon adsorption,

    727-746 influence of ozone, 585 organic compounds, 90

    Biodgradation products of surfactants, 112 Biogeochemical changes, 78 Biological activity

    filter systems, 724 pilot plant, 723-724 tubing system, 724

    Biological macromolecules, 100 Biological oxygen demand, dissolved

    organic compounds, 455 Biological partition coefficients, reverse-

    phase method and toxicokinetics, 270 Bisolute isotherms

    p-DCB in the prescence of TCE, 511/ TCE in the presence of p-DCB, 512/, 513/

    Bisolute systems, comparison of breakthrough levels, 527*

    Bitumen, stream sediment humin, 50/, 51/, 51-52

    Bonding between chromium and fulvic acid, 314-318

    Bonding mechanisms, influence of steric factors, 220

    Bottom sediments, 41 Bound humic acid, IR spectra, 48 Bound lipids, stream sediment humin, 51/,

    51-52 Bound pollutants, behavior, 173-174 Breakthrough curves, prediction, 524, 592 Breakthrough levels for single-solute

    systems, comparison, 520* Brine-staged composite RO units, process

    flow sheet, 793/ Bromide ions, trihalomethanes, 789-790 Bromoform, flux decline, 784 Byproducts, result of side reactions, 90

    C

    Caged pair, 336 Calcium ions, removal of PCB, 574

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    In Aquatic Humic Substances; Suffet, I., et al.; Advances in Chemistry; American Chemical Society: Washington, DC, 1988.

  • 842 AQUATIC HUMIC SUBSTANCES

    Carbon adsorption of complex mixtures, with other treatment processes, 530

    Carbon columns, experimental conditions, 706*

    Carbon filters, range of operating conditions, 587*

    Carbon filtration, THMFP reduction, 674 Carbon surface, groups of pores, 699 Carboxylic groups

    anionic character, 387 on aquatic humic substances, 798 quantitative estimation, 485 trace metals, 387 vibration, 48

    Carrier flow, 67 Catalase, peroxide concentration, 351 Catalytic effect

    conversion of ozone to hydroxyl radical, 659

    solution-phase humic acids, 325-326 Cellulose acetate membranes

    mean membrane capacity, 777/ treatment efficiency and flux, 770

    Character of humic substances, effect of ozonation, 679

    Characteristics of DHM, degree of binding, 554

    Charcoal adsorption, potentially hazardous contaminants, 549

    Charge neutralization destabilization, 401 particle removal, 450

    Charge-neutralization mechanism, removal of contaminants, 410

    Charge-transfer interaction, dissolved humic materials and chloranil, 173-183

    Charge-transfer mechanism, humic acids and organic molecules, 179

    Chattahoochee Water Treatment Plant flow diagram and operational conditions,

    476/ source water

    general characteristics, 477* humic substances, 477*

    water-quality parameters, 478/ Chelation

    hazardous wastes, 87 metals complexed with FA, 421 stabilization of reduced cationic form, 88

    Chemical and structural properties of DOM, 274

    Chemical degradation, 3-23 Chemi...

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