adapting the landscape

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A presentation on the 'Adapting the Landscape' framework prepared for the lower Mersey basin in 2009/10.

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  • Adapting the Landscape

    Accelerating Growth across the Manchester and Liverpool City Regions

    Final Report

    Adapting the Landscape

    Accelerating Growth across the Manchester and Liverpool City Regions

    Final Report

  • Introductory slide - logo soup & title

    The Crisis: Get me out of here!There is a feeling we get which says dont stay. Dont even linger. We dont. So whats the problem? Here are two:

    To start with two great cities sit at the edge of this zone, emerging from the dark days of decline after World War II. Getting people families and workers - to stay is hard. Persuading more to come an even tougher sell. An area's image has a huge impact on economic investment.

    That apart, the region is living on borrowed time. The cities are heating up. Big swaths of land alongside the rivers are in very real danger of being flooded including about 20,000 homes. Our food and our fuel come from the other side of the world. Thats not what made this place tick the Sefton coast was once wind farms, the streams north of Manchester powered water mills, the Lancashire hills gave us coal and the Cheshire plains fed us.

    From a new perspective, we can see the lands value. Untapped land and river frontage can be a repository for our desires and needs.

    What makes people want to stay? Great cities today have great surroundings. Its become more important now than ever for city leaders to understand what people are looking for. For newcomers, place comes first and job comes second. A place means green lungs for neighbourhoods, seamless connections to beauty, art and culture, and an overall sense of quality whether it is the schools or the architecture.

    We also want to feel that the place is up to the days challenges. Quality of life isn't just enhanced by nice things to look at, it is about engaging with a place and believing that this engagement is worthwhile and can make a better world. Today, people see high quality environment as not just nice green grass and trimmed hedges, but a place to grow food and form local communities.

    Adapting the Landscape from Liverpool to Manchester / Draft Report on Scenarios / July 2009 2

  • URS Corporation

    WXY StudioWest 8Urban PractitionersBarnes WalkerCreative Concern

  • 1. IntroductionThis report provides further detail on the different scenarios that have been developed to inform the thinking from the baseline work and analysis through to a combined spatial strategy.

    1.1. Project summaryThe Adapting the Landscape research study, aims to contribute to the understanding of the potential and scope for strategic green infrastructure interventions in the area connecting Liverpool with Manchester. It will identify where such investment can best improve the quality of life for residents, ensure climate change mitigation and adaptation and underpin economic growth.

    1.2. ApproachThe report represents the final task in the fist phase of the project. This first phase has involved the production of a detailed baseline analysis, review of constraints and opportunities and the development of different scenarios. Having produced the initial scenarios the team worked alongside the steering group and a range of experts and stakeholders to test and refine the work. This culminated in an expert symposium held over two days to refine the thinking. The results of that work are presented within the following report.

    1.3. The study areaThe study area is characterised by a unique natural and industrial landscapes that have a range of distinctive elements on which the work builds. Central to the area both spatially and thematically is water. The River Mersey, Manchester Ship, Sankey and Bridgewater Canals have been major influences on the way that the area has developed naturally and economically.

    In understanding the future of the area it is necessary to build on the past and how it has shaped the area. The area is renowned for its history of pioneering and innovating in terms of industrialisation and invention. Examples include the first railway, the industrial revolution and at the time of construction the largest man made waterway in the world, the Manchester Ship Canal.

    1.4. Key ChallengesIn order to frame the study and scenarios the team identified the main challenges that would impact on the area and its population over the short to long term. Events of the past 18 months have shown how closely the economies of the worlds nations are linked and how quickly actions in one area of the globe can spread and impact on others.

    These changes have affected people at all levels of society and demonstrated how no individual or area is insulated from change. The current economic situation has also identified the pressing need for collective action to alleviate both short and long term problems.

    Birkenhead

    Liverpool

    Ellesmere

    Widnes

    Runcorn

    Warrington

    St. Helens

    Manchester

    M62

    M56

    M6

    9 Adapting the Landscape from Liverpool to Manchester / Draft Report on Scenarios / July 2009

  • This strand is based around a move towards a more self-sufficient, sustainable region with a stress on localism, renewable energy production, the growing of food and energy crops and a landscape well adapted to climate change.

    This strand is about connecting the city regions and major towns with stronger communications set in an area of attractive and marketable green infrastructure. There would be a focus on jobs and opportunities through the connection of knowledge centres and growth industries including environmental technologies and services.

    This strand recognises the importance of high quality, accessible local environments where people can play, travel and work. Waterways will become destinations and leisure routes, flood alleviation measures will be used to create new landscapes and culture and art will be used to engage with and transform the visual experience of the region.

    These three strands underpin a spatial framework for the Mersey Basin, focusing on the urban hearts to the sub-region, the water courses and routes tracing through it to connect key places and the watershed as a multifunctional, productive landscape.

    Here are some strategic initiatives to get started; these are detailed with key programme activities in the Initiatives section.

    Green the cities Take the landscape play of the Mersey Basin right into the heart of our two cities with more street trees.

    Embrace the waterfronts Millions of people live within just a few miles of the Mersey. Lets create green access along the river and other waterways, stretching into the heart of our city regions and where possible, new water bodies.

    Create a diverse landscape Create the Mersey Bioregion as the most dynamic, productive and bio-diverse landscape through land art, farms and planting.

    Manage a productive landscape Produce energy from wind, tides and the sun.

    Facilitate an accessible landscape A 21st century fine grain network of paths and bridges to accompany the strategic ones with an emphasis on localism.

    Create a landscape for prosperity The history of the Mersey is one of innovation. In centres like Daresbury it is environmental technologies leading our way into a low carbon future.

    Build a resilient and playful landscape The challenge of responding to flood risks can become a big signature for the Mersey. Let us utilise the funding to create iconic cultural landmarks, public space and new bio-diverse habitats as part of the Mersey Playgrounds.

    Mersey bioregion

    Innovation axis

    FORT WORTH

    DALLAS

    THAMES GATEWAY

    LIVERPOOLMANCHESTER

    Area

    Population

    Employment

    GVA

    1835.313 km

    6 million

    1.4 million

    50 billion

    LIVERPOOL / MANCHESTER2

    EMSCHER PARK

    SINGAPORE

    Area

    Population

    Employment

    GVA

    1000 km

    1.45 million

    637,000

    20.6 billion

    THAMES GATEWAY2

    Area

    Population

    Employment

    GVA

    710.2 km

    4.99 million

    2.94 million

    -

    SINGAPORE2

    Area

    Population

    Employment

    GVA

    457 km

    5.2 million

    2.27 million

    108 billion

    EMSCHER PARK, GERMANY2

    Area

    Population

    Employment

    GVA

    24,100 km

    6,538,850

    2,935,000

    227.9 billion

    FORT WORTH / DALLAS METROPLEX2

    District of

    Unna

    Hagen

    Essen

    District ofRecklinghausen

    District ofWeseel

    Arlington Mesquite

    Hurst

    Lewisville

    Tuas

    Ang Mo KioNew Town

    Stratford Southend

    Chatham

    Runcorn

    Warrington

    Salford

    FORT WORTH

    DALLAS

    THAMES GATEWAY

    LIVERPOOLMANCHESTER

    Area

    Population

    Employment

    GVA

    1835.313 km

    6 million

    1.4 million

    50 billion

    LIVERPOOL / MANCHESTER2

    EMSCHER PARK

    SINGAPORE

    Area

    Population

    Employment

    GVA

    1000 km

    1.45 million

    637,000

    20.6 billion

    THAMES GATEWAY2

    Area

    Population

    Employment

    GVA

    710.2 km

    4.99 million

    2.94 million

    -

    SINGAPORE2

    Area

    Population

    Employment

    GVA

    457 km

    5.2 million

    2.27 million

    108 billion

    EMSCHER PARK, GERMANY2

    Area

    Population

    Employment

    GVA

    24,100 km

    6,538,850

    2,935,000

    227.9 billion

    FORT WORTH / DALLAS METROPLEX2

    District of

    Unna

    Hagen

    Essen

    District ofRecklinghausen

    District ofWeseel

    Arlington Mesquite

    Hurst

    L

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