A Naturalist in Indian Territory: The Journals of S. W. Woodhouse, 1849-50by John S. Tomer; Michael J. Brodhead; S. W. Woodhouse

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  • Society for Historians of the Early American Republic

    A Naturalist in Indian Territory: The Journals of S. W. Woodhouse, 1849-50 by John S.Tomer; Michael J. Brodhead; S. W. WoodhouseReview by: Charlotte M. PorterJournal of the Early Republic, Vol. 13, No. 4 (Winter, 1993), pp. 586-587Published by: University of Pennsylvania Press on behalf of the Society for Historians of the EarlyAmerican RepublicStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/3124592 .Accessed: 14/06/2014 08:30

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  • JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC JOURNAL OF THE EARLY REPUBLIC

    The book is a veritable history of the Mexican War, beginning with its origins in Texas and concluding with the peace treaty finally ratified by both countries. Within a general chronological approach, the author has interspersed topical sections and chapters dealing with such subjects as raising regular and volunteer troops (112,000 men served in the war), transportation to the war zone, camp life, types of

    guns and ammunition issued, soldiers' emotions during and after bat- tle, amusements and entertainments, army newspapers, ethnic and

    religious controversies, desertion, misbehavior and military punish- ments (from simple admonitions to courts-martial that inflicted the death penalty), and reception of the soldiers when they returned home.

    The book has an excellent chapter about health problems in the field during the war. Disease killed seven times as many soldiers as

    enemy bullets; in fact, almost eleven thousand soldiers died, and sev- eral thousand others were discharged on account of it. Dysentery, cholera, malaria, smallpox, and yellow fever were principal killers, but even such illnesses as mumps and measles proved fatal to many. The diseases stemmed from polluted drinking water, contaminated

    food, and poor camp sanitation. Such a high death rate was related to the state of medical knowledge at that time when the methods of dis- ease transmission were poorly understood. Treatments used by army surgeons (such as bloodletting and amputation without anesthesia) are discussed, along with mention of common drugs administered

    (quinine sulfate, ipecacuanha, and calomel). The Army of Manifest Destiny fills a previously vacant niche in the

    literature of America's first foreign war. By bringing together dispa- rate material and neatly tying it to eyewitness accounts and observa-

    tions, the author has performed a welcome service for those interested in reading about the war. Furthermore, the book is well written, and readers will enjoy the many anecdotes used to illustrate the author's

    points.

    California State University, Hayuward Robert Ryal Miller

    A Naturalist in Indian Territory: The Journals of S. W. Woodhouse, 1849-50. Edited by John S. Tomer and Michael J. Brodhead. The American Exploration and Travel Series. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1992. Pp. xv, 304. Illustrations. $29.95.)

    Following the Creek Treaty of 1833, the United States left the north- ern and western boundaries of Creek lands in Indian Territory un-

    surveyed. After Creek agitation, the Corps of Topographical

    The book is a veritable history of the Mexican War, beginning with its origins in Texas and concluding with the peace treaty finally ratified by both countries. Within a general chronological approach, the author has interspersed topical sections and chapters dealing with such subjects as raising regular and volunteer troops (112,000 men served in the war), transportation to the war zone, camp life, types of

    guns and ammunition issued, soldiers' emotions during and after bat- tle, amusements and entertainments, army newspapers, ethnic and

    religious controversies, desertion, misbehavior and military punish- ments (from simple admonitions to courts-martial that inflicted the death penalty), and reception of the soldiers when they returned home.

    The book has an excellent chapter about health problems in the field during the war. Disease killed seven times as many soldiers as

    enemy bullets; in fact, almost eleven thousand soldiers died, and sev- eral thousand others were discharged on account of it. Dysentery, cholera, malaria, smallpox, and yellow fever were principal killers, but even such illnesses as mumps and measles proved fatal to many. The diseases stemmed from polluted drinking water, contaminated

    food, and poor camp sanitation. Such a high death rate was related to the state of medical knowledge at that time when the methods of dis- ease transmission were poorly understood. Treatments used by army surgeons (such as bloodletting and amputation without anesthesia) are discussed, along with mention of common drugs administered

    (quinine sulfate, ipecacuanha, and calomel). The Army of Manifest Destiny fills a previously vacant niche in the

    literature of America's first foreign war. By bringing together dispa- rate material and neatly tying it to eyewitness accounts and observa-

    tions, the author has performed a welcome service for those interested in reading about the war. Furthermore, the book is well written, and readers will enjoy the many anecdotes used to illustrate the author's

    points.

    California State University, Hayuward Robert Ryal Miller

    A Naturalist in Indian Territory: The Journals of S. W. Woodhouse, 1849-50. Edited by John S. Tomer and Michael J. Brodhead. The American Exploration and Travel Series. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1992. Pp. xv, 304. Illustrations. $29.95.)

    Following the Creek Treaty of 1833, the United States left the north- ern and western boundaries of Creek lands in Indian Territory un-

    surveyed. After Creek agitation, the Corps of Topographical

    The book is a veritable history of the Mexican War, beginning with its origins in Texas and concluding with the peace treaty finally ratified by both countries. Within a general chronological approach, the author has interspersed topical sections and chapters dealing with such subjects as raising regular and volunteer troops (112,000 men served in the war), transportation to the war zone, camp life, types of

    guns and ammunition issued, soldiers' emotions during and after bat- tle, amusements and entertainments, army newspapers, ethnic and

    religious controversies, desertion, misbehavior and military punish- ments (from simple admonitions to courts-martial that inflicted the death penalty), and reception of the soldiers when they returned home.

    The book has an excellent chapter about health problems in the field during the war. Disease killed seven times as many soldiers as

    enemy bullets; in fact, almost eleven thousand soldiers died, and sev- eral thousand others were discharged on account of it. Dysentery, cholera, malaria, smallpox, and yellow fever were principal killers, but even such illnesses as mumps and measles proved fatal to many. The diseases stemmed from polluted drinking water, contaminated

    food, and poor camp sanitation. Such a high death rate was related to the state of medical knowledge at that time when the methods of dis- ease transmission were poorly understood. Treatments used by army surgeons (such as bloodletting and amputation without anesthesia) are discussed, along with mention of common drugs administered

    (quinine sulfate, ipecacuanha, and calomel). The Army of Manifest Destiny fills a previously vacant niche in the

    literature of America's first foreign war. By bringing together dispa- rate material and neatly tying it to eyewitness accounts and observa-

    tions, the author has performed a welcome service for those interested in reading about the war. Furthermore, the book is well written, and readers will enjoy the many anecdotes used to illustrate the author's

    points.

    California State University, Hayuward Robert Ryal Miller

    A Naturalist in Indian Territory: The Journals of S. W. Woodhouse, 1849-50. Edited by John S. Tomer and Michael J. Brodhead. The American Exploration and Travel Series. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1992. Pp. xv, 304. Illustrations. $29.95.)

    Following the Creek Treaty of 1833, the United States left the north- ern and western boundaries of Creek lands in Indian Territory un-

    surveyed. After Creek agitation, the Corps of Topographical

    The book is a veritable history of the Mexican War, beginning with its origins in Texas and concluding with the peace treaty finally ratified by both countries. Within a general chronological approach, the author has interspersed topical sections and chapters dealing with such subjects as raising regular and volunteer troops (112,000 men served in the war), transportation to the war zone, camp life, types of

    guns and ammunition issued, soldiers' emotions during and after bat- tle, amusements and entertainments, army newspapers, ethnic and

    religious controversies, desertion, misbehavior and military punish- ments (from simple admonitions to courts-martial that inflicted the death penalty), and reception of the soldiers when they returned home.

    The book has an excellent chapter about health problems in the field during the war. Disease killed seven times as many soldiers as

    enemy bullets; in fact, almost eleven thousand soldiers died, and sev- eral thousand others were discharged on account of it. Dysentery, cholera, malaria, smallpox, and yellow fever were principal killers, but even such illnesses as mumps and measles proved fatal to many. The diseases stemmed from polluted drinking water, contaminated

    food, and poor camp sanitation. Such a high death rate was related to the state of medical knowledge at that time when the methods of dis- ease transmission were poorly understood. Treatments used by army surgeons (such as bloodletting and amputation without anesthesia) are discussed, along with mention of common drugs administered

    (quinine sulfate, ipecacuanha, and calomel). The Army of Manifest Destiny fills a previously vacant niche in the

    literature of America's first foreign war. By bringing together dispa- rate material and neatly tying it to eyewitness accounts and observa-

    tions, the author has performed a welcome service for those interested in reading about the war. Furthermore, the book is well written, and readers will enjoy the many anecdotes used to illustrate the author's

    points.

    California State University, Hayuward Robert Ryal Miller

    A Naturalist in Indian Territory: The Journals of S. W. Woodhouse, 1849-50. Edited by John S. Tomer and Michael J. Brodhead. The American Exploration and Travel Series. (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1992. Pp. xv, 304. Illustrations. $29.95.)

    Following the Creek Treaty of 1833, the United States left the north- ern and western boundaries of Creek lands in Indian Territory un-

    surveyed. After Creek agitation, the Corps of Topographical

    The book is a veritable history of the Mexican War, beginning with its origins in Texas and concluding with the peace treaty finally ratified by both countries. Within a general chronological approach, the author has interspersed topical sections and chapters dealing with such subjects as raising regular and volunteer troops (112,000 men served in the war), transportation to the war zone, camp life, types of

    guns and ammunition issued, soldiers' emotions during and after bat- tle, amusements and entertainments, army newspapers, ethnic and

    religious controversies, desertion, misbehavior and military punish- ments (from simple admonitions to courts-martial that inflicted the death penalty), and reception of the soldiers when they returned home.

    The book has an excellent chapter about health problems in the field during the war. Disease killed seven times as many soldiers as

    enemy bullets; in fact, almost eleven thousand soldiers died, and sev- eral thousand others were discharged on account of it. Dysentery, cholera, malaria, smallpox, and yellow fever were principal killers, but even such illnesses as mumps and measles proved fatal to many. The diseases stemmed from polluted drinking water, contaminated

    food, and poor camp sanitation. Such a high death rate was related to the state of medical knowledge at that time when the methods of dis- ease transmission were poorly understood. Treatments used by army surgeons (such as bloodletting and amputation without anesthesia) are discussed, along with mention of common drugs administered

    (quinine sulfate, ipecacuanha, and calomel). The Army of Manifest Destiny fills a previously vacant niche in the

    literature of America's first foreign war. By bringing together dispa- rate material and neatly tying it to eyewitness accounts and observa-

    tions, the author has performed a welcome service for those interested in reading about the war. Furthermore, the book is well written, and readers will enjoy the many anecdotes used to illustrate the author's

    points.

    California State University, Hayuward Robert Ryal Miller

    A Naturalist in Indian Territory: The Journals of S. W. Woodhouse, 18...

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