18 MILE CREEK RESTORATION ***SOME PROJECT GOALS***

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GOAL & FUNCTION-BASED DESIGN FOR RIPARIAN & STREAM SYSTEMS THE EIGHTEENMILE CREEK PROJECT PHASE I CONSTRUCTED AUG-SEPT 2003 PHASE II CONSTRUCTED JUNE 18-20, 2007 by Dave Derrick. - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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<ul><li><p>GOAL &amp; FUNCTION-BASED DESIGN FOR RIPARIAN &amp; STREAM SYSTEMSTHE EIGHTEENMILE CREEK PROJECT PHASE I CONSTRUCTED AUG-SEPT 2003PHASE II CONSTRUCTED JUNE 18-20, 2007by Dave Derrick</p></li><li><p>EIGHTEENMILE CREEK IS A SUBURBAN, GRAVEL-COBBLE BED, POOL-RIFFLE-POOL REGIME STREAM IN A V-SHAPED VALLEY</p></li><li><p> SOME ASPECTS OF THE 18 MILE CREEK PROJECT PHILOSOPHY</p><p>*As much as possible, techniques used were developed by observing nature and natural processes.**Design team worked with existing stream alignment and materials that were available***Designers wanted to work with the stream (nudge, not fight) stream energy and stream tendencies</p></li><li><p>18 MILE CREEK RESTORATION ***SOME PROJECT GOALS***Aquatic habitat enhancement/restoration for Atlantic, Coho, and Chinook salmon, steelhead, Brown Trout, and bass.In response to incredible fishing pressure (9,000 TO 11,000 fisher folks yearly during runs), access and ingress and egress to the stream, encouragement for recreators to wade, back cast space for fly fishermen, safety, aesthetics (a natural look), &amp; access trails for emergency personnel/vehicles were all driving project goalsStabilization of eroding banks and some riparian corridor vegetation (especially leaning trees) Need to artificially carbon-load the carbon depleted areas, and integrate long-term carbon into the projectRe-establishment and enhancement of riparian buffer areasRevegetate all disturbed areas, establish tough plants for high foot traffic areasMinimize disturbance of downstream areas, especially with regard to habitat areas of T&amp;E species Blandings Turtle</p></li><li><p>The "Locked Limb/Locked Log" Concept Consists of small trees and/or Small Woody Debris (SWD consisting of limbs, limbs with leaves, sections of small tree trunks, tree tops, etc.), anchored within or placed under structures, with limbs/logs protruding into deeper scoured areas to provide in-stream cover, vertical and horizontal structure, and areas of refugia.Can be either hand- or machine-placedLocked Limbs are typically less than 2 inches in diameter, Locked Logs are greater than 2 inches in diameter</p></li><li><p> Close-up shot of the DS reference area, if you were a fish, where would you hang out? Is nature grand, or what?Pix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>Locked Logs ready for stone riprapPix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>Everything is now locked in place with stone Pix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>Row of Locked LogsPix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>Locked Limbs &amp; Locked Logs - June 24, 2004Pix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>4 Years later June 18, 2007Pix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>Soil-Choked RIPRAP from John McCullahswww.E-SenSS.comFrom: www.E-SenSS.comJohn</p></li><li><p>Rooted stock plants waiting to be planted, 18 Mile Cr., {SUBURBAN, GRAVEL-COBBLE BED, POOL-RIFFLE-POOL REGIME STREAM IN A V-SHAPED VALLEY} Newfane, NYMini case study: 1 of 4</p></li><li><p>Rooted stock plants in place, ready for additional soil to choke riprap and surround plantsMini case study: 2 of 4</p></li><li><p>Sock rooted stock plants placed within voids in riprap, then riprap choked with soil and seeded.Mini case study: 3 of 4</p></li><li><p>June 24, 2004-Growing well a year laterMini case study: 4 of 4</p></li><li><p>4 Years later June 18, 2007Pix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>THE GREAT WALL OF NEWFANE</p></li><li><p>In this case a 100% spun coir mat, 700 grams/meterMini case study: 3 of 5</p></li><li><p>Half a growing season later, June 24, 2004Mini case study: 4 of 5</p></li><li><p>Looking US, 3 growing seasons after installation, Aug 25, 2006PIX FROM PAUL FUHRMANNMini case study: 5 of 5</p></li><li><p>Pix by Derrick4 growing seasons later, June 13, 2008</p></li><li><p>Pix by DerrickLooking US. 5 growing seasons later. Riparian plantings are robust, June 7, 2009</p></li><li><p>Pix by Derrick5 growing seasons later riparian plantings are robust. June 7, 2009</p></li><li><p> Large single stones placed in a flowing channel. Three versions: 1.) Top of the stone set at an elevation slightly lower than the typical base-flow water surface elevation. When sited correctly, the accelerated flow over the top of the stone will change from subcritical to supercritical flow, &amp; further downstream back to subcritical (usually with a weak hydraulic jump). The hydraulic jump will entrain air &amp; aerate the stream. 2.) Stone crest set just below the base flow water surface elevation results in an acceleration of the water moving over the top of the stone, with standing waves forming downstream of the stone. 3.) Stone crest set slightly above the base flow water surface, resulting in a V-shaped wake and flow split with a double return eddy flow pattern DS of the stone. However, these stones might be used as perches for predators.The constant movement &amp; rippling of the water from the three types of Hydraulic Cover Stones results in a type of cover, hydraulic cover, masking fish location from the view of predators. The stones also provide resting areas &amp; in-channel refugee for fish during high energy, high-flow events. Hydraulic Cover Stones are especially useful in sections of the stream with little in-channel structure, or vegetative cover, or undercut banks.Hydraulic Cover Stones (HCS)</p></li><li><p>Natural Hydraulic Cover Stones on Elton Creek &amp; Genesee River, NYHydraulic Cover Stone at Elton Creek, NY Flow</p></li><li><p>Close-up of Large Stones, these were hand selected &amp; are 3 ft by 3 ft with two sides flat.My sneaker</p></li><li><p>Here comes Jimmy with a Hydraulic Cover Stone!!!</p></li><li><p>Note sediment near stone acting as a dye trace.Flow</p></li><li><p>The first stone, lookin good and working hard!!Flow</p></li><li><p>Functions of Hydraulic Cover StonesProvides micro-topography (scour &amp; deposition)Provides diversity of velocitiesProvides hydraulic cover, turbulence, return currents, eddy fences, internal distortion, pressure zonesProvides feeding lanes for fishProvides shape cover &amp; solid substrate for benthicsProvides refugiaDissipates energy Can aerate water, or de-gas super-saturated water</p></li><li><p>Looking DS, note locations of Hydraulic Cover Stones during unusually low flow conditions</p></li><li><p>Hydraulic Cover Stones provide improved aquatic habitatHydraulic Cover Stones shown functioning 3 different ways !!!! Graphics courtesy of Ecology &amp; Environment, Inc.</p></li><li><p>Pix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>I love this picture!!An everyday fisherman said the best fishing was immediately US of these 3 Hydraulic Cover Stones which form a mini pool within a pool, so to speakPix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>Flow from left to right, note weak hydraulic jump DS over the Hydraulic Cover StonePix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>Flow from left to right, note wake from Hydraulic Cover StonesPix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>A nice brown trout caught among the Hydraulic Cover Stones</p></li><li><p>Multi-Use Hydraulic Cover Stones, in this case a fishermans resting rock, (FRR)FRRSometimes you just have to park it !!Pix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>PHASE II OF THE EIGHTEENMILE CREEK PROJECT CONSTRUCTED JUNE 18-20, 2007</p></li><li><p>PHASE II FUNCTIONSConstructed immediately DS of the 2003 restoration projectFUNCTIONS:Narrowed stream to increase low flow velocities &amp; provide cover, holding areas, solid substrate, and also allow off-channel areas to revegetate as emergent aquatic marshesProvide access for fishermenProvide aquatic habitat (diversity and complexity)Provide hydraulic cover (disturbance of surface water, difficult for predators to see fish)</p></li><li><p>Plan Drawing for Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007The Traffic Control Stone Wall</p></li><li><p>From overhead trestle, looking @ the DS end of the TCS wall. Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007, Pix-Vic DiGialomo</p></li><li><p>THE FISHERMANS WALKING PATH(right bank)</p></li><li><p>Plan Drawing for Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007The Traffic Control Stone WallThe Fishermans path with a Single Stone Bendway Weir every 20 ft.</p></li><li><p>Placing stones in compression on the underwater footer stones.Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007, Pix-Vic DiGialomo</p></li><li><p>Flow from left, looking @ stones in compression.Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007, Pix by DerrickSee the footer stone?</p></li><li><p>Close-up of fishermans path stones in compression.Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007, Pix by DerrickSee the footer stone?</p></li><li><p>Vic with a Single Stone Bendway Weir. There is a SSBW every 20 ft jutting into the channel from the Fishermans path.Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007, Pix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>Looking US. Placing a Single Stone Bendway Weir. Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007, Pix-Vic DiGialomo</p></li><li><p>A Single Stone Bendway Weir tied into the fishermans path.Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007, Pix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>Looking US. Fishermans path complete and being used.Post-Project-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-Oct 16, 2007, Pix-Fuhrmann</p></li><li><p>SMILES, FROWNS, KICKERS, SINGLE HYDRAULIC COVER STONES, CLUSTERS OF HYDRAULIC COVER STONES All in-channel, as much as we could fit in and still provide functions listed below, all in the name of good fishing.FUNCTIONS:Provide cover for fishes, dissipate stream energy, speed current through narrow deep mini channels, divert flow, redirect, cause eddy fences, calm water, holding areas, feeding lanes, diversity &amp; complexity of flow both vertical &amp; horizontal, &amp; surface disturbances</p></li><li><p>Plan Drawing for Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007The Traffic Control Stone WallThe Fishermans path with a Single Stone Bendway Weir every 20 ft.</p></li><li><p>Looking US. Lots of channels, holding water, diversity, etc.Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007, Pix-Vic DiGialomo</p></li><li><p>Flow left to right, placing Hydraulic Cover Stones Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007, Pix-Vic DiGialomo</p></li><li><p>Looking US @ TCS wall &amp; HCS, Smiles &amp; FrownsPost-Project-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-Oct 16, 2007, Pix-Fuhrmann</p></li><li><p>Looking across &amp; US. HCS, Smiles, Frown, KickerPost-Project-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-Oct 16, 2007, Pix-FuhrmannFishermans path being used</p></li><li><p>For this project, its all about the fishing!!!Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-June 2007, Pix by Derrick</p></li><li><p>Its all about the fishing!!!!Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-Fall 2007</p></li><li><p>Its all about the fishing!!!!Construction-18 Mile Creek, Phase II-Fall 2007</p></li><li><p>MY BASSETT HOUND, CLEOPHUS SPEED ELVIS DERRICK, AT RESTCan you get as relaxed as this??</p><p>*Based on the interagency publication, Stream Corridor Restoration: Principles, Processes, and Practices, this introductory training covers:</p><p> Stream corridor ecosystems and their components Ecological processes, structure &amp; functions Characterization and analysis of stream corridors Development of a restoration plan Design, implementation, monitoring, and Integrated, iterative, adaptive, flexible approaches.</p></li></ul>

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